episode

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ep·i·sode

 (ĕp′ĭ-sōd′)
n.
1.
a. A separate part of a serialized work, such as a novel or television series.
b. A section of a classic Greek tragedy that occurs between two choric songs.
2.
a. An incident or event that is part of a progression or a larger sequence: "one brief, if distressing, episode in a life rich in adventures, challenges, sorrows and joys" (Elizabeth Speller).
b. One of a series of events in the course of a narrative or drama. See Synonyms at occurrence.
3. Music A passage between statements of a main subject or theme, as in a rondo or fugue.

[French épisode, from Greek epeisodion, parenthetic narrative, from neuter of epeisodios, coming in besides : epi-, epi- + eisodios, entering (eis, into; see en in Indo-European roots + hodos, way, journey).]

episode

(ˈɛpɪˌsəʊd)
n
1. an incident, event, or series of events
2. (Broadcasting) any one of the sections into which a serialized novel or radio or television programme is divided
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an incident, sequence, or scene that forms part of a narrative but may be a digression from the main story
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in ancient Greek tragedy) a section between two choric songs
5. (Music, other) music a contrasting section between statements of the subject, as in a fugue or rondo
[C17: from Greek epeisodion something added, from epi- (in addition) + eisodios coming in, from eis- in + hodos road]

ep•i•sode

(ˈɛp əˌsoʊd, -ˌzoʊd)

n.
1. an incident in the course of a series of events, in a person's life or experience, etc.
2. an incident, scene, etc., within a narrative, usu. fully developed and either integrated within the main story or digressing from it.
3. a dramatic section in an ancient Greek tragedy between two choral odes.
4. a digressive section in a musical composition, as a fugue.
5.
a. any one of the separate productions that constitute a serial, as in motion pictures or radio.
b. any one of the separate programs that constitute a television or radio series.
[1670–80; < Greek epeisódion addition, episode]
syn: See event.

episode

- First a Greek dialogue between two songs, it is from eis, "into," and hodos, "way."
See also related terms for songs.

episode

An incident or group of incidents forming a section of a story; one installment of a serialized story.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.episode - a happening that is distinctive in a series of related eventsepisode - a happening that is distinctive in a series of related events
happening, natural event, occurrence, occurrent - an event that happens
dramatic event, drama - an episode that is turbulent or highly emotional
chapter - a series of related events forming an episode; "a chapter of disasters"
idyll - an episode of such pastoral or romantic charm as to qualify as the subject of a poetic idyll
incident - a single distinct event
2.episode - a brief section of a literary or dramatic work that forms part of a connected series
section, subdivision - a self-contained part of a larger composition (written or musical); "he always turns first to the business section"; "the history of this work is discussed in the next section"
3.episode - a part of a broadcast serial
broadcast, program, programme - a radio or television show; "did you see his program last night?"
serial, series - a serialized set of programs; "a comedy series"; "the Masterworks concert series"
cliffhanger - an episode that ends in suspense
4.episode - film consisting of a succession of related shots that develop a given subject in a movie
photographic film, film - photographic material consisting of a base of celluloid covered with a photographic emulsion; used to make negatives or transparencies
motion picture, motion-picture show, movie, moving picture, moving-picture show, pic, film, picture show, flick, picture - a form of entertainment that enacts a story by sound and a sequence of images giving the illusion of continuous movement; "they went to a movie every Saturday night"; "the film was shot on location"

episode

noun
1. event, experience, happening, matter, affair, incident, circumstance, adventure, business, occurrence, escapade an unfortunate and rather sordid episode in my life
2. instalment, part, act, scene, section, chapter, passage The final episode will be shown next Saturday.
3. period, attack, spell, phase, bout He suffered three episodes of depression in two years.

episode

noun
Something significant that happens:
Translations
حَلَقَه في مُسَلْسَلحَلَقَه، حادِثَهمُدَّة
epizodapříhoda
afsnitepisodehændelsebegivenhed
episodijaksotapahtumatapaus
epizoda
epizódeseményrész
atvik; òátturòáttur
エピソード
일화
epizodas
daļaepizodesērija
epizóda
epizoda
episod
ตอน
hồi

episode

[ˈepɪsəʊd] N (= event) → acontecimiento m (TV, Rad) → capítulo m, episodio m (Press) → entrega f (Med) → ataque m

episode

[ˈɛpɪsəʊd] n
[story, series] → épisode m
(= event) → épisode m
an episode in sth → un épisode dans qch

episode

nEpisode f; (of story, TV, Rad) → Fortsetzung f; (= incident)Begebenheit f, → Vorfall m

episode

[ˈɛpɪsəʊd] nepisodio

episode

(ˈepisəud) noun
1. an incident, or series of events, occurring in a longer story etc. The episode of/about the donkeys is in Chapter 3; That is an episode in her life that she wishes to forget.
2. a part of a radio or television serial that is broadcast at one time. This is the last episode of the serial.

episode

مُدَّة příhoda episode Episode επεισόδιο episodio tapahtuma épisode epizoda episodio エピソード 일화 episode episode epizod episódio эпизод episod ตอน bölüm hồi 插曲

ep·i·sode

n. episodio, evento no regulado, en serie o independiente que puede formar parte de una condición física o de un estado mental, o de ambos, y que se manifiesta en ciertas enfermedades tal como la epilepsia.

episode

n episodio
References in periodicals archive ?
Efficacy of aripiprazole versus placebo as adjuncts to lithium or valproate in relapse prevention of manic or mixed episodes in bipolar I patients stratified by index manic or mixed episode.
The bipolar patients were in manic episode (n = 6), depressive episode (n = 5), and mixed episode (n = 5).
This is reflected by changes in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) mixed features specifiers, compared with the earlier designation of mixed episode in the DSM Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR).
It's also possible to experience a mixed episode when a person has symptoms of depression and mania at the same time.
Mixed episode was found in a case of schizoaffective disorder following use of varenicline (18).
Medication use in adolescents treated in a French psychiatric setting for acute manic or mixed episode. J Can Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2009;18:231-238
After ruling out a medical or pharmacological explanation, counselors should first evaluate the possibility that the emotional instability a new client exhibits occurs as part of a manic, hypomanic, or mixed episode (Magill, 2004).
The 52-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized withdrawal trial compared continued use of aripiprazole with placebo in adults aged 1865 years with bipolar I and a history of at least one manic or mixed episode requiring hospitalization, treatment with a mood stabilizer, and/ or treatment with an antipsychotic agent.
The analysis specifically focused on asenapine's effects on depressive symptoms in patients with bipolar I disorder who had significant depressive symptoms at study baseline and were experiencing an acute manic or mixed episode, rather than a depressive episode.
Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic condition with the lifetime prevalence estimated at around 4% for all types of this disorder.1 In the United States, National Comorbidity Survey found that 1% of the population met lifetime prevalence criteria for bipolar I (presence of at least one manic or mixed episode), 1.1% for bipolar II (major depressive episodes with at least 1 hypomanic episode), and 2.4% for sub-threshold symptoms such as one or two features over a short period of time.2 Prevalence is similar in men and women and, broadly, across different cultures and ethnic groups.3 Late adolescence and early adulthood are peak years for the onset of bipolar disorder.4
In another study of 161 patients aged 13-17 years with bipolar disorder who were in an acute manic or mixed episode, those who received 2.5 mg to 20 mg per day of olanzapine had reductions in the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) total score (the primary efficacy end point) that were significantly greater than the reductions seen among those on placebo, after 3 weeks of treatment.