Mixolydian mode


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Related to Mixolydian mode: Aeolian mode, Dorian mode, Phrygian mode, Æolian mode

Mix`o`lyd´i`an mode`


1.(Mus.) The seventh ecclesiastical mode, whose scale commences on G.
References in periodicals archive ?
15--built on the mixolydian mode, based on major arpeggios separated by one tone and its inversions.
The authors cover the keys of C, G, D, A and E with explorations of the mixolydian mode and the standard blues scale (inexplicably labeled the "power scale" here).
Future applications of this process lead to a more informed use of full diatonic scales such as the Mixolydian mode, as well chromatic melodic embellishments.
At the same time, she uses this final chapter to review the salient features of each case study and retrospectively demonstrates the logic behind the composer's choice of mode for a particular text, whether for its capacity to underline paradox--as with the Mixolydian mode of "Cruda Amarilli," for example--or to evoke anguish or mimic a troubled inwardness.
From in-depth analysis of pertinent examples emerge recurring stylistic traits, such as semitonal relations, third- and seventh-degree inflection, octatonic activity, tritonal polarity, sequentially 'treated second-inversion chords, altered Mixolydian mode (with flattened sixth) in addition to traditional modes, and multiple ostinatos that cut across individual phrases.
From in-depth analysis of pertinent examples, recurring stylistic traits emerge, such as semitonal relations, third- and seventh-degree inflection, octatonic activity, tritonal polarity, sequentially treated second-inversion chords, altered Mixolydian mode (with flattened sixth) in addition to traditional modes, and multiple ostinatos, which cut across any particular phase.
We are told, for instance, that the Mixolydian mode is characterized by the fourth species of 5th (p.
In 6/8 time with a marking of tres vite, the key signature is two sharps, but is written in the Mixolydian mode (a major scale with a flatted seventh degree).
The most striking example is the Greek Mixolydian mode, the white-key scale on B (and one of Plato's "mournful" modes), which is nearly as far in sound and affect as one can get from the ecclesiastical (and Maconie's) Mixolydian, the white-key scale on G.
La Morsia, Tumeo and Carrozza, in contrast, begin their settings with traditional expositions of the Mixolydian mode.