modalism


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Related to modalism: Arianism

modalism

(ˈməʊdəˈlɪzəm)
n
(Theology) a Christian doctrine that states that the Father, Son and Holy Ghost are one being exhibited in three different ways rather than three separate entities

modalism

the theological doctrine that the members of the Trinity are not three separate persons but modes or forms of God’s self-expression. — modalist, n. — modalistic, adj.
See also: Heresy
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, they define the meaning of this term, explicitly affirming that each of the three has "the whole divine essence, yet the essence undivided" to avoid accusations of modalism and tritheism.
Classical modalism about essence is the view that essence can be analyzed in modal terms.
The UPCI rejects the doctrine of Trinity in favour of a Christocentric Unitarian modalism, and its members are therefore called "Oneness Pentecostals.
The ancient heresy of Sabellius was a form of modalism that denied the Trinity, affirming instead that God had shown three different faces during the course of human history.
The early Christian heresy of modalism over-emphasized the oneness of God to the exclusion of differentiation, suggesting that Father, Son, and Holy Spirit were "modes" of God but not true persons capable of differentiated relationship.
The honoring of God's enduring covenant with Israel, however, eliminates the viability of such modalism.
I am not, for example, endorsing a type of Modalism that fails to distinguish between the Son and the other divine persons.
In that theology there were two major Christologies: adoptionism and modalism.
Lastly, the Christian participants, through the explanation that the Trinity describes "aspects or manifestations of the oneness of God," appear to get Patterson to soften his position that Jews and Christians do not really worship the same God (243-47), although it bears mentioning that such a view of the Trinity sounds very much like modalism, which was traditionally condemned as a heresy.
Sabellianism, Adoptionism, Modalism, Arianism) had loomed the inconceivability of assigning the Son the same godly nature and status as held by the Father.
He maintained that tritheism is deeply embedded in the Christian imagination and "is a much greater danger than a Sabellian modalism.