modernist

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mod·ern·ism

 (mŏd′ər-nĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. Modern thought, character, or practice.
b. Sympathy with or conformity to modern ideas, practices, or standards.
2. A peculiarity of usage or style, as of a word or phrase, that is characteristic of modern times.
3. often Modernism The deliberate departure from tradition and the use of innovative forms of expression that distinguish many styles in the arts and literature of the 1900s.
4. often Modernism A Roman Catholic movement, officially condemned in 1907, that attempted to examine traditional belief according to contemporary philosophy, criticism, and historiography.

mod′ern·ist n.
mod′ern·is′tic adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.modernist - an artist who makes a deliberate break with previous stylesmodernist - an artist who makes a deliberate break with previous styles
artist, creative person - a person whose creative work shows sensitivity and imagination
Translations

modernist

[ˈmɒdənɪst]
A. ADJmodernista
B. Nmodernista mf

modernist

nModernist(in) m(f)
References in classic literature ?
The coach was a kind of commodious wagonette, invented by the modernist talent of the courier, who dominated the expedition with his scientific activity and breezy wit.
Visual culture--cinema, photography, visual arts -, just as other technological innovations are inspirational and depressing to modernists, and Maggie Humm, in "Women Modernists and Visual Culture", analyses the impact of the visual arts on modernist experiments.
Greg Barnhisel, Cold War Modernists: Art, Literature, and American Cultural Diplomacy, New York: Columbia University Press, 2015, ISBN: 978-0-231-16230-2, Hardcover, 336 pp., $40.00
TOLKIEN AND THE MODERNISTS: LITERARY RESPONSES TO THE DARK NEW DAYS OF THE 20TH CENTURY.
The body part starts with modernists' revolutionary departure from realism in their pursuit of extreme verisimilitude, especially by introducing everyday speech into literature, and two critical controversies surrounding modernism.
After his introduction, Genter gives almost equal attention to high, romantic, and late modernism throughout his eight chapters because he defines his late modernists, as individuals and as a group, against the ideas and arguments of high and romantic modernists, respectively Genter argues that an otherwise "varied" group of high modernists including literary and cultural critics like Theodor Adorno, Lionel'Trilling, and Allen Tate prized the autonomous work of art, formalism, and orthodox Freudian psychology, inter alia (13).
Carr's discussion of Woolf and empire points out how the analysis of politics in Woolf's work led to a consideration of politics in relation to modernism more generally, arguing that this was "seen as fundamental to a critical understanding of her work, well before the politics of those male modernists began to be analysed" (200).
Why do you think modernists like Joyce, Proust, Kafka, Pound, Eliot, Woolf and many others' writings are still relevant?
Pare's photos of the derelict Vasileostrovski Factory Kitchen, also in St Petersburg, illustrate the way in which collapsing modernist structures show up the limitations the Russian modernists faced.
Yet Saints Their Watch Are Keeping: Fundamentalists, Modernists, and the Development of Evangelical Ecclesiology, 1887-1937.
There are canonical works by Pound, Eliot, Joyce, Yeats, Williams, Stevens, Moore, Crane, Woolf, and Beckett, a strong representation of the women modernists whose work has been so central to the revival of modernist studies, including Stein, Loy, H.
In response to the award, Cobb ob served, "Ed Barnes was arguably the most accomplished and influential of those American-born architects who were trained by the first generation of European Modernists and then went on to give Modernism a specifically American voice.