mode of transport

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Related to Modes of transport: Means of transport

mode of transport

The various modes used for a movement. For each mode, there are several means of transport. They are: a. inland surface transportation (rail, road, and inland waterway); b. sea transport (coastal and ocean); c. air transportation; and d. pipelines.
References in periodicals archive ?
the transport of goods by these modes of transport is also the responsibility of the bav.
Collaborating with HMDA, Ford will engage with the relevant stakeholders and explore solutions in areas such as digital cashless one-time payments, mobile-based ticketing and smart card payments for passengers transiting through different modes of transport.
Summary: Integrated transport plans and strategies covering all possible modes of transport, not just vehicular movement, are required
to give way to other modes of transport (cycling, walking .
It will be a preparation for the integration of ONTC's services with other modes of transport supervised by other authorities, he added.
At the Heritage Transport Museum in Gurgaon, which recently launched its first calendar, the focus might be on cars, but there is considerable emphasis on other modes of transport as well.
Speaking about the tram connectivity, Al Hassan said the tram platforms are well connected with other modes of transport, including the metro, bus, monorail and shuttle buses.
The city's built environment is always changing, so we have to ensure that we make sure that sustainable modes of transport are given every chance to flourish.
Dubai's Roads and Transport Authority (RTA) is exploring alternative modes of transport in the Zabeel and Burj Khalifa areas including monorails and people mover systems, a senior figure told CW .
It is very difficult to establish a comparison between different modes of transport," he concluded.
All modes of transport are concerned: air, rail, road, maritime/inland waterways, plus logistics and intelligent transport systems.
The list of concrete initiatives spells out what can be expected, including full liberalisation of rail networks (national passenger transport and award of public service contracts through tender procedures), structurally separate infrastructure managers and railway companies, revision of the very sensitive legislation on airport slots, elimination of remaining restrictions on road cabotage (domestic freight transport), a third attempt to liberalise port services (the first two, in 2003 and 2006, failed owing to the European Parliament's opposition), CO2 emissions standards for all types of vehicles, internalisation of external costs in all modes of transport, including passenger cars (tolls), and so on.