Modest Mussorgsky


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Noun1.Modest Mussorgsky - Russian composer of operas and orchestral works (1839-1881)Modest Mussorgsky - Russian composer of operas and orchestral works (1839-1881)
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59;' and Modest Mussorgsky's 'Pictures at an Exhibition.'
Maharram will perform in the opera "Khovanshchina" by the Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky. He will play the role of a pastor.
The Audio tab features five "radio stations" (Martha Argerich, Marian Anderson, Ursula Mamlok, Leonard Bernstein, and Modest Mussorgsky), a handful of links to ensembles and playlists, and a search box.
A Peter Tchaikovsky B Modest Mussorgsky C Mikhail Glinka D Alexander Borodin
The concert program included well-known romances by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, Modest Mussorgsky, Alexander Borodin, and rarely performed works of Ferenc Liszt, Pyotr Bulakhov, Anton Arensky and Dmitry Tolstoy.
King cites numerous other examples of Jackson's use of classical tunes, mentioning composers including Carl Orff, Modest Mussorgsky, and MiklEs REzsa.
Audiences will be presented with images of the eternal battle between the forces of good and evil with Night on Bald Mountain by Modest Mussorgsky, Le Streghe (Witches Dance) for violin and orchestra, op.
1860: On St John's Eve, Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky completed St John's Night On A Bare Mountain.
Her aesthetic leans toward the crimson sneer and purple eye shadow of the Wicked Queen, the satanic curves of Maleficent's headdress, or the bat-winged hell creature of Modest Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain.
The dances reflect the diverse cultures of the world, painting choreographic scenes, miniatures and one-act ballets against music of great Russian composers including Modest Mussorgsky, Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov and Mikhail Glinka, among others.
The performance will take audiences through masterful renditions of famous pieces by established composers such as Modest Mussorgsky and Anton Bruckner.
Although the sources for his faces are mostly the images housed in London's National Portrait Gallery,* reading this book is no mere stroll through the galleries, nor is it a written variation, say, of Modest Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition (1874).