Moholy-Nagy


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Mo·holy-Nag·y

 (mə-hō′lē-nŏj′, mō′hoi-nŏd′yə), László 1895-1946.
Hungarian-born American artist and educator known for his artistic experiments with modern technology. He founded and directed (1938-1946) the Chicago Institute of Design.

Moholy-Nagy

(məˈhəʊlɪˈnɒdʒɪ)
n
(Biography) Laszlo (ˈlæzləʊ) or Ladislaus (ˈlɑːdɪsˌlaʊs). 1895–1946, US painter and teacher, born in Hungary. He worked at the Bauhaus (1923–29)
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(8.) Moholy-Nagy, "Vorwart," Von Material zu Architektur (1929; repr., Mainz and Berlin: Florian Kupferberg, 1968), 7; see also the "Foreword" in the English edition, titled, The New Vision, from Material to Architecture, trans.
Josef Albers (who had started there as a student) and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy were particularly involved.
In the 1920s, '30s, and '40s, experimental filmmakers such as Hans Richter, Oskar Fischinger, and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy had already attempted to transfer various idioms of abstract painting to film.
As part of her formal art education she attended the New Bauhaus School in Chicago where she studied with Laszlo Moholy-Nagy. After her art training, she was a window dresser at Ulian's Department store in Worcester.
Julia Nema earned her MFA in 2002 at Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design Budapest, Hungary, where she is a teacher and doctorate (DLA) student.
1-8, Sibyl Moholy-Nagy, Die Stadt als Schicksal, Munich: Callwey, 1968
Hays reprints a 1928 photograph by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy of a Zeiss dome under construction, without citing Banersfeld.
Construido a partir de un eje que vincula y relaciona paradigmas artisticos modernos, pop, minimalistas y conceptuales, el discurso curatorial integra las diferentes generaciones y poeticas que constituyen la coleccion, desde el hungaro Laszlo Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946), hasta el mexicano Gabriel Cazares (1978) del colectivo regiomontano Tercerunquinto.
Also on display will be film works by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, architectural models, design, applied art, furniture and a specially commissioned wall drawing.
The third film in the first half - Laszlo Moholy-Nagy's Ein Lichtspiel - was married to a score by Kenneth Hesketh, another RLP commission for 10/10.
In the early 20th century, Moholy-Nagy, Man Ray and Christian Schad used the technique.
In addition to organizing shows devoted to painters and sculptors such as Max Ernst, Salvador Dali, Leonor Fini, Alberto Giacometti, and Yves Tanguy, Levy boldly put on display the photographs of Paul Strand, Man Ray, Brassai, Andre Kertdsz, and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, among many others.