hydrogen

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hy·dro·gen

 (hī′drə-jən)
n. Symbol H
A colorless, highly flammable element, that occurs as a diatomic molecule, H2, the lightest of all gases and the most abundant element in the universe, used in the production of synthetic ammonia and methanol, in petroleum refining, in the hydrogenation of organic materials, as a reducing atmosphere, in oxyhydrogen torches, in cryogenic research, and in rocket fuels. Atomic number 1; atomic weight 1.00794; melting point -259.1°C; boiling point -252.8°C; density at 0°C 0.08988 gram per liter; valence 1. See Periodic Table.

[French hydrogène : Greek hudro-, hydro- + French -gène, -gen.]

hy·drog′e·nous (-drōj′ə-nəs) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hydrogen

(ˈhaɪdrɪdʒən)
n
(Elements & Compounds)
a. a flammable colourless gas that is the lightest and most abundant element in the universe. It occurs mainly in water and in most organic compounds and is used in the production of ammonia and other chemicals, in the hydrogenation of fats and oils, and in welding. Symbol: H; atomic no: 1; atomic wt: 1.00794; valency: 1; density: 0.08988 kg/m3; melting pt: –259.34°C; boiling pt: –252.87°C. See also deuterium, tritium
b. (as modifier): hydrogen bomb.
[C18: from French hydrogène, from hydro- + -gen; so called because its combustion produces water]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hy•dro•gen

(ˈhaɪ drə dʒən)

n.
a colorless, odorless, flammable gas, the lightest of the elements, that combines chemically with oxygen to form water. Symbol: H; at. wt.: 1.00797; at. no.: 1; density: 0.0899 g/l at 0°C and 760 mm pressure.
[< French hydrogène (1787); see hydro-1, -gen]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·dro·gen

(hī′drə-jən)
Symbol H A colorless, odorless, highly flammable gaseous element that is the lightest and most abundant element in the universe. It occurs in water in combination with oxygen, in most organic compounds, and in small amounts in the atmosphere as a gaseous mixture of its three isotopes (protium, deuterium, and tritium). In the sun and other stars, the conversion of hydrogen into helium by nuclear fusion produces heat and light. Hydrogen is used to make rocket fuel, synthetic ammonia, and methanol, to hydrogenate fats and oils, and to refine petroleum. Atomic number 1. See Periodic Table. See Note at oxygen.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hydrogen - a nonmetallic univalent element that is normally a colorless and odorless highly flammable diatomic gashydrogen - a nonmetallic univalent element that is normally a colorless and odorless highly flammable diatomic gas; the simplest and lightest and most abundant element in the universe
tritium - a radioactive isotope of hydrogen; atoms of tritium have three times the mass of ordinary hydrogen atoms
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
H2O, water - binary compound that occurs at room temperature as a clear colorless odorless tasteless liquid; freezes into ice below 0 degrees centigrade and boils above 100 degrees centigrade; widely used as a solvent
gas - a fluid in the gaseous state having neither independent shape nor volume and being able to expand indefinitely
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
водород
hidrogen
vodík
brinthydrogen
hidrogeno
vesinik
هیدروژن
vety
हाइड्रोजन
hidrogenvodik
hidrogén
hydrogeno
hidrogen
vetni
水素
수소
hydrogenium
vandenilis
ūdeņradisvandenilis
ഹൈഡ്രജന്‍
hidrogen
vodík
vodik
väte
hidrojeni
ก๊าซไฮโดรเจน
водень
آبگر
hiđrôhi-đrôhyđrôhy-đrôkhí hydro

hydrogen

[ˈhaɪdrɪdʒən]
A. Nhidrógeno m
B. CPD hydrogen bomb Nbomba f de hidrógeno
hydrogen chloride Ncloruro m de hidrógeno
hydrogen peroxide Nagua f oxigenada
hydrogen sulphide Nácido m sulfhídrico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hydrogen

[ˈhaɪdrədʒən] nhydrogène mhydrogen bomb nbombe f à hydrogènehydrogen peroxide neau f oxygénée
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

hydrogen

nWasserstoff m, → Hydrogenium nt (spec)

hydrogen

:
hydrogen bomb
hydrogen bond
nWasserstoffbrücke(nbindung) f
hydrogen sulphide
n (= gas)Schwefelwasserstoff m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

hydrogen

[ˈhaɪdrɪdʒn] nidrogeno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

hydrogen

(ˈhaidrədʒən) noun
an element, the lightest gas, which burns and which, when combined with oxygen, produces water.
hydrogen bomb (ˈeitʃbom) (also H-bomb )
a very powerful bomb in which the explosion is caused by turning hydrogen into helium at a very high temperature.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

hydrogen

هَيْدْرُوجِيـنٌ vodík brint Wasserstoff υδρογόνο hidrógeno vety hydrogène hidrogen idrogeno 水素 수소 waterstof hydrogen wodór hidrogénio, hidrogênio водород väte ก๊าซไฮโดรเจน hidrojen khí hydro
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

hy·dro·gen

n. hidrógeno;
___ concentrationconcentración de ___.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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On itswebsite, NASA states: "A torrent of ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from the massive, central stars of the Trapezium star cluster has carved out a cavernous bowl-like cavity in the wall of a giant cloud of cold molecular hydrogen laced with dust."
The large amounts of hydrogen adsorbed in the solid-state accumulators can be retained either by means of formation of chemical compounds or by physical adsorption of molecular hydrogen in micropores.
Below the deep atmosphere lies molecular hydrogen tainted with helium.
A unique antioxidant, molecular hydrogen, has research supporting its ability to activate Nrf2 receptors also.
The amount of methyl isocyanate they detected -- the abundance -- with respect to molecular hydrogen and other tracers is comparable to previous detections around two high-mass protostars (i.e.
The HTWO team found that infusing purified water with molecular hydrogen helped reduce the drinker's fatigue and lactic acid buildup while boosting metabolism without any calories, sugars, fats or additives.

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