Molinism


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Molinism

(ˈmɒlɪnɪzəm)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a doctrine of grace that attempts to reconcile the efficacy of divine grace with human free will in responding to it
[C17: named after Luis de Molina (1535–1600), Spanish Jesuit who taught such a doctrine]

Molinism

the doctrine of the 16th-century Jesuit Luis Molina, who taught that the work of grace depends on the accord of man’s free will. — Molinist, n.
See also: Catholicism
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These texts show that Descartes at different times wrestles with whether he should prefer the established Dominican solution or the more recent Jesuit solution, a theory called Molinism, after the Jesuit theologian Luis de Molina.
(9) While this topic occupied his doctoral work, his subsequent De ente supernaturali also addressed the question of the relationship between grace and nature in general and in a way that again cuts a unique path between (or above) the diametrically opposed neo-Augustinianism of Henri de Lubac and the "extrinsicism" of the traditional Thomist commentators, much like his interpretation of Aquinas transcends the false dichotomy of Banezianism versus Molinism.
Dean Zimmerman argues in favor of 'simple foreknowledge' to bring us back to the issue of Molinism. One of the primary objections to simple foreknowledge, which rejects the counterfactuals on which Molinism relies, is that it is not providentially useful.
A third approach is Molinism, after the Jesuit scholar Luis de Molina of the late sixteenth century.
'Molinism.' Insofar as Browning portrayed Caponsacchi and
However, Molinism tended toward an extrinsic account of actual grace, thus delimiting any certainty that one could even experience the inspiration and strength of the Holy Spirit.
"Salvation and Sovereignty: A Molinist Approach" is a discussion of faith as Kenneth Keathley places the Calvinist principles that state God has control of all things in the world, and discusses it against Molinism, a doctrine that believes God controls the world, but humanity has free will and control of their own destiny.
In fact, these ministers successfully crafted arguments that Thomism (or the doctrinal school aligned with Dominicans and Augustinians and opposed to the laxity of Molinism) better supported regalist rights, while the Jesuit school excused regicide and supported papal prerogatives over all others.