molybdate

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molybdate

(mɒˈlɪbdeɪt)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a salt or ester of a molybdic acid

mo•lyb•date

(məˈlɪb deɪt)

n.
a salt of any molybdic acid.
[1785–95]
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References in periodicals archive ?
A great deal of interest has been devoted to the chemistry of molybdenum; a significant number of new molybdates have been synthesized and characterized.
Szilagyi, "Thermal decomposition of ammonium molybdates," Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry, vol.
Nitrates, molybdates, and tungstates also have been used.
RE molybdates having general formula [R.sub.2][(Mo[O.sub.4]).sub.3] have been reported as a ferroelectric material [1].
Bismuth molybdates have the general chemical formula [Bi.sub.2][O.sub.3] * nMo[O.sub.3] where n = 3, 2 or 1, corresponding to the [alpha]-[Bi.sub.2][Mo.sub.3][O.sub.12], [beta]-[Bi.sub.2][Mo.sub.2][O.sub.9], and [gamma]-[Bi.sub.2]Mo[O.sub.6].
Replacing molybdates, where possible, will remain a top priority as molybdate prices remain comparatively high, and some concerns about their environmental impact have arisen.
Xie, "Enhanced photocatalytic activity of bismuth molybdates with the preferentially exposed 010 surface under visible light irradiation," Journal of Molecular Catalysis A, vol.
It was thought that these ions, back-exchanged to the environment, could generate inhibitive species such as molybdates.
1, mine a notable mineral locality regardless of the presence of copper molybdates! Worldwide, powellite typically occurs as inconspicuous pulverulent halos around molybdenite crystals, which are best observed under ultraviolet light.