monasticism

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mo·nas·ti·cism

 (mə-năs′tĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
The monastic life or system, especially as practiced in a monastery.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

monasticism

(məˈnæstɪˌsɪzəm)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the monastic system, movement, or way of life
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

monasticism

1. the rule or system of life in a monastery.
2. the life or condition of a monk. — monastic, n., adj. — monastical, adj.
See also: Christianity
a regularized program of religious observance, asceticism, and work foliowed in a monastery; monachism. — monastic, n., adj.
See also: Monks and Nuns
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

monasticism

Withdrawing from everyday life to concentrate on prayer and meditation.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monasticism - asceticism as a form of religious lifemonasticism - asceticism as a form of religious life; usually conducted in a community under a common rule and characterized by celibacy and poverty and obedience
austerity, nonindulgence, asceticism - the trait of great self-denial (especially refraining from worldly pleasures)
eremitism - monasticism characterized by solitude in which the social dimension of life is sacrificed to the primacy of religious experience
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

monasticism

[məˈnæstɪsɪzəm] Nmonacato m, vida f monástica
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

monasticism

nMönch(s)tum nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

monasticism

[məˈnæstɪˌsɪzm] nmonachesimo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The five apologies are </Apoligia de "In Principio erat Sermo"/>, Apologia de Loco "Omnes Quidem Resurgemus"/>, </Apologia Adversus Debacchationes Petri Sutoris Appendix Respondens ad Quaedam Antapologiae Petri Sutoris/>,</Apologia Adversus Articulos Aliquot per Monachos Quosdam in Hispaniis Exhibitos/>, and </Admonitio Adversus Mendacium et Obtrectationem/>.
Anthony of Egypt, for example, the first true monachos, lived alone in the Egyptian desert to the age of 105, if Athanasius's Life of Anthony is to be believed.
In the appendix of the De opere monachorum Augustine addresses with sharp irony the hairy monks (In monachos crinitos), who, refusing to cut their hair, openly contested Paul's authority on the necessity to work: "Or, because they say that they imitate the Gospel birds, do they fear to be, as it were, plucked, lest they be not able to fly?"; "An quia evangelicas volucres imitari se dicunt, quasi depilati timent, ne volare possint?" De opere monachorum 39, xxxi.
(49) Atanasio de Alejandria, Historia arianorum ad monachos, 4-4, 6-8, <<[TEXTO IRREPRODUCIBLE EN ASCII.]>>.
ipsi se monachos Graio nomine dicunt, quod soli nullo vivere teste volunt.