monastery

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mon·as·ter·y

 (mŏn′ə-stĕr′ē)
n. pl. mon·as·ter·ies
1. A community of persons, especially monks, bound by vows to a religious life and often living in partial or complete seclusion.
2. The dwelling place of such a community.

[Middle English monasterie, from Old French monastere, from Late Latin monastērium, from Late Greek monastērion, from Greek monazein, to live alone, from monos, alone; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

mon′as·te′ri·al (mŏn′ə-stîr′ē-əl, -stĕr′-) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

monastery

(ˈmɒnəstərɪ; -strɪ)
n, pl -teries
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the residence of a religious community, esp of monks, living in seclusion from secular society and bound by religious vows
[C15: from Church Latin monastērium, from Late Greek monastērion, from Greek monázein to live alone, from monos alone]
monasterial adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mon•as•ter•y

(ˈmɒn əˌstɛr i)

n., pl. -ter•ies.
1. a place of residence occupied by a community of persons, esp. monks, living in religious seclusion.
2. the community itself.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin monastērium < Late Greek monastḗrion orig. hermit's cell =*monad-, base of monázein to be alone, derivative of mónos alone + -tērion n. suffix]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

monastery

A building complex, including a church or abbey, inhabited by monks or nuns.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monastery - the residence of a religious communitymonastery - the residence of a religious community
abbey - a monastery ruled by an abbot
cubicle, cell - small room in which a monk or nun lives
charterhouse - a Carthusian monastery
friary - a monastery of friars
lamasery - a monastery for lamas
minster - any of certain cathedrals and large churches; originally connected to a monastery
cloister, religious residence - residence that is a place of religious seclusion (such as a monastery)
scriptorium - a room in a monastery that is set aside for writing or copying manuscripts
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

monastery

noun abbey, house, convent, priory, cloister, religious community, nunnery, friary He spent a year in a Buddhist monastery.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
دَيْردَيْرٌ
манастир
klášter
kloster
دیرصومعه
luostarimunkkiluostari
samostanmanastir
kolostor
klausturmunkaklaustur
修道院
수도원
monasterium
vienuoliškasvienuolynų
klosteris
monastériomosteiro
samostan
kloster
ที่อยู่ของพระ
tu viện

monastery

[ˈmɒnəstrɪ] Nmonasterio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

monastery

[ˈmɒnəstəri] nmonastère m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

monastery

n(Mönchs)kloster nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

monastery

[ˈmɒnəstrɪ] nmonastero
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

monastery

(ˈmonəstəri) plural ˈmonasteries noun
a house in which a community of monks lives.
moˈnastic (-ˈnӕ-) adjective
of, or like, monks or monasteries. the monastic way of life.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

monastery

دَيْرٌ klášter kloster Kloster μοναστήρι monasterio munkkiluostari monastère samostan monastero 修道院 수도원 klooster kloster klasztor mosteiro монастырь kloster ที่อยู่ของพระ manastır tu viện 修道院
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
We took the final product with us as our own souvenirs from participating in a monastic community.
Nick says he is particularly interested in stories that have spirituality at their heart and the film tells the story of the Cistercian monastic community near Whitwick - a community of 25 men, half of whom are more than 80 years old.
When the sisters of Red Plains Monastery in Piedmont, Oklahoma left several years ago to join the monastic community in Atchison, Kansas, they left behind a number of oblates they had trained to become spiritual directors.
NNA - President of the Republic, Michel Aoun, on Monday visited the Maronite monastic community center "Life Mission" at the general presidency in Antelias, at the invitation of its founder, General Father Wissam Maalouf.
Sarah Jean Thompson of the Sisterhood of Saint John the Divine (SSJD), an Anglican monastic community in Toronto, regularly teaches workshops on how to make and use Anglican rosaries.
There was also unease at growing influence of the Russian Orthodox Church at Mount Athos, Greece's all-male monastic community in northern Greece, the newspaper said
In his opening remarks at the Rome congress, Abbot Primate Gregory Polan said it is time to "give wings" to the Oblate community He described Oblates as part of a "sacred triangle" that includes "God at the top, the Oblates in one corner and the monastic community in the other."
In early Buddhism, although Buddhist discipleship diversified from an exclusively monastic community to a fourfold assembly (parisd)-male monastics, female monastics, laymen, and laywomen (e.g., A.ii.132) monastics continued to be regarded as de facto leaders in religious tasks.
Over seventy pages of notes, a bibliography, and an index round out this thoughtful examination of cognitive concepts and (at times prejudiced) categorizations among oblates (individuals who have affiliated themselves with a monastic community, even though they are not themselves monks or nuns), particularly the oblates of Mary Immaculate at Ile-a-la-Crosse.
And if an army marches on its stomach then a Monastic community certainly prays on its stomach.
These texts describe the way rulers engaged with the Buddhist monastic community (building temples, sponsoring feasts, seeking advice) as well as with local spirit cults.
The formation of the graves suggest that the monastic community believed in literal or corporeal resurrection.