monetarism

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Related to Monetarist view: Monetarist Theory

mon·e·ta·rism

 (mŏn′ĭ-tə-rĭz′əm, mŭn′-)
n.
1. A theory holding that economic variations within a given system, such as changing rates of inflation, are most often caused by increases or decreases in the money supply.
2. A policy that seeks to regulate an economy by altering the domestic money supply, especially by increasing it in a moderate but steady manner.

mon′e·ta·rist adj. & n.

monetarism

(ˈmʌnɪtəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Economics) the theory that inflation is caused by an excess quantity of money in an economy
2. (Economics) an economic policy based on this theory and on a belief in the efficiency of free market forces, that gives priority to achieving price stability by monetary control, balanced budgets, etc, and maintains that unemployment results from excessive real wage rates and cannot be controlled by Keynesian demand management
ˈmonetarist n, adj

mon•e•ta•rism

(ˈmɒn ɪ təˌrɪz əm, ˈmʌn-)

n.
a doctrine holding that changes in the money supply determine the direction of a nation's economy.
[1965–70, Amer.]
mon′e•ta•rist, n., adj.

monetarism

1. an economic theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money.
2. the principle put forward by American economist Milton Friedman that control of the money supply and, thereby, of rate in the supply of credit serves to control inflation and recession while fostering prosperity. — monetarist, n., adj.
See also: Economics
an economie theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money. — monetarist, n., adj.
See also: Money

monetarism

An economic policy based on controlling a country’s money supply.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monetarism - an economic theory holding that variations in unemployment and the rate of inflation are usually caused by changes in the supply of moneymonetarism - an economic theory holding that variations in unemployment and the rate of inflation are usually caused by changes in the supply of money
economic theory - (economics) a theory of commercial activities (such as the production and consumption of goods)
Translations
monetarizam
monetaryzm

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪzəm] Nmonetarismo m

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪzəm] nmonétarisme m

monetarism

nMonetarismus m

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtˌrɪzm] nmonetarismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies go with Monetarist view that inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomenon (Brumm, 2005; Qayyum, 2006; Okpara and Nwaoha, 2010; Bakare, 2011).
Here I take a Monetarist view that (i) open market operations affect the quantity of liquidity in the system--the money supply, if you like--and (ii) changes in this magnitude are what determine inflation rates.
In the monetarist view, excess money balances spill over into the bond and money markets.
The monetarist view of inflation rests on the Classical Quantity Theory of Money (QTM) based on two main assumptions (Lucas, 1980; Friedman, 1956).
Some researchers find support for the monetarist view, which suggests that monetary policy generally has a greater impact on economic growth and dominates fiscal policy in terms of its impact on investment and growth.
It is important to clarify whether the stability condition can be achieved under two theoretical inflation views--the fiscal theory of price level and the monetarist view.
He co-authored Principles of Economics (1991) and authored Money and the Economy: A Monetarist View (1978) as well as numerous scholarly papers published in professional journals.
4) Following almost perfectly the monetarist view, constant growth rate rules for the money supply have a prominent role in the statute of the ECB (the euro area M3 money supply has a 4.
Where the Keynesian school saw causation running from prices to money, the monetarist view was the opposite; the central bank, through its control of the monetary base, could achieve price stability without a long-run inflation-unemployment tradeoff.
In addition, the very fact that monetary policy, not fiscal policy, is considered the major weapon to combat economic fluctuation is a clear victory for the monetarist view.