money supply

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money supply

n.
The amount of money in the economy. Measures of money supply usually include cash in circulation and current account deposits in banks, but may also include savings deposits or time-restricted deposits.

money supply

n
(Economics) the total amount of money in a country's economy at a given time. See also M0, M1, M2, M3, M3c, M4, M5

money supply

The amount of money in an economy at a given moment. There are various ways in which the money supply can be defined. Narrowly defined, the money supply can mean the coins and bank notes in circulation and bank deposits where money can be withdrawn at short notice. A broader definition will also include savings accounts at banks and possibly bonds and shares.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.money supply - the total stock of money in the economymoney supply - the total stock of money in the economy; currency held by the public plus money in accounts in banks
M1 - a measure of the money supply; includes currency in circulation plus demand deposits or checking account balances
M2 - a measure of the money supply; M1 plus net time deposits (other than large certificates of deposit)
M3 - a measure of the money supply; M2 plus deposits at institutions that are not banks (such as savings and loan associations)
money - the most common medium of exchange; functions as legal tender; "we tried to collect the money he owed us"
Translations

money supply

nliquidità f inv monetaria
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent research into the construction of monetary aggregates (see the Barnett 2nd Serletis collected volume for the United States) attributes the breakdown in demand for money functions during the 1980s to the use of conventional official simple sum aggregates.
(9) It involves five main elements: 1) the public announcement of medium-term numerical targets for inflation; 2) an institutional commitment to price stability as the primary goal of monetary policy, to which other goals are subordinated; 3) an information inclusive strategy in which many variables, and not just monetary aggregates or the exchange rate, are used for deciding the setting of policy instruments; 4) increased transparency of the monetary policy strategy through communication with the public and the markets about the plans, objectives, and decisions of the monetary authorities; and 5) increased accountability of the central bank for attaining its inflation objectives.
This scenario is especially relevant in today's economic environment, where money growth as measured by some monetary aggregates has been relatively strong over the past couple of years.
As in previous years, the Committee interpreted the ranges for the broader monetary aggregates as benchmarks for what money growth would be under conditions of price stability and sustainable economic growth, assuming historically typical velocity behavior.
Nakahara said it is necessary "to demonstrate as clearly as possible the bank's critical view of the condition of the economy," adding he considered it appropriate to slightly lower the level of the unsecured overnight call money rate "to give what boost possible to monetary aggregates."
The paper reports little evidence in support of the superiority of the Divisia monetary aggregates. Both types of measure produce a stable demand for money and perform satisfactorily in post-sample stability tests, although the Divisia measure appears to perform marginally better on conventional statistical criteria.
Although the targeting of monetary aggregates has many important advantages in principle, in practice these advantages come about only if the monetary aggregates have a highly predictable relationship with nominal income.
The admissible collections of assets are then combined using Divisia aggregation in order to produce monetary aggregates which are consistent with economic aggregation theory.
It is now widely acknowledged that financial markets deregulation and financial innovations have significantly altered the relationship between monetary aggregates and macroeconomic goals such as output and price stability.
The first four essays consist of a series of studies on the usefulness of monetary aggregates as intermediate targets or information variables.
It starts by using open-market operations in an effort to achieve "operating targets," which are the values of bank reserves and the federal funds rate that it believes are consistent with achieving the values of "intermediate targets" (e.g., growth in the monetary aggregates), which in turn are deemed consistent with achieving the desired ultimate effects on inflation and economic activity.
This volume, their counterpart to Friedman and Schwartz's Monetary Statistics of the United States (1970), presents new estimates of monetary aggregates and their components for the period 1870-1982 and sets out their sources and methods of construction.