monetarism

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mon·e·ta·rism

 (mŏn′ĭ-tə-rĭz′əm, mŭn′-)
n.
1. A theory holding that economic variations within a given system, such as changing rates of inflation, are most often caused by increases or decreases in the money supply.
2. A policy that seeks to regulate an economy by altering the domestic money supply, especially by increasing it in a moderate but steady manner.

mon′e·ta·rist adj. & n.

monetarism

(ˈmʌnɪtəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Economics) the theory that inflation is caused by an excess quantity of money in an economy
2. (Economics) an economic policy based on this theory and on a belief in the efficiency of free market forces, that gives priority to achieving price stability by monetary control, balanced budgets, etc, and maintains that unemployment results from excessive real wage rates and cannot be controlled by Keynesian demand management
ˈmonetarist n, adj

mon•e•ta•rism

(ˈmɒn ɪ təˌrɪz əm, ˈmʌn-)

n.
a doctrine holding that changes in the money supply determine the direction of a nation's economy.
[1965–70, Amer.]
mon′e•ta•rist, n., adj.

monetarism

1. an economic theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money.
2. the principle put forward by American economist Milton Friedman that control of the money supply and, thereby, of rate in the supply of credit serves to control inflation and recession while fostering prosperity. — monetarist, n., adj.
See also: Economics
an economie theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money. — monetarist, n., adj.
See also: Money

monetarism

An economic policy based on controlling a country’s money supply.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monetarism - an economic theory holding that variations in unemployment and the rate of inflation are usually caused by changes in the supply of moneymonetarism - an economic theory holding that variations in unemployment and the rate of inflation are usually caused by changes in the supply of money
economic theory - (economics) a theory of commercial activities (such as the production and consumption of goods)
Translations
monetarizam
monetaryzm

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪzəm] Nmonetarismo m

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪzəm] nmonétarisme m

monetarism

nMonetarismus m

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtˌrɪzm] nmonetarismo
References in periodicals archive ?
We aim to please a broad audience, addressing economic issues at the frontier of research on economic theory and policy, with a special interest in macroeconomics, financial issues, monetary economics, banking, and monetary policy
Grasso holds a Masters degree in Economic Policy from Universidade de BrasE[degrees]lia and was Professor of International Economics and Monetary Economics at the Pontifical Catholic University of BrasE[degrees]lia, and of Economy Mathematics at the Centro UniversitEirio do Distrito Federal.
The NBER's Monetary Economics Program met in Cambridge on November 7, 2014.
Ahmed Munawar has attained his Bachelor's Degree in Economics and Finance, at the International Islamic University Malaysia; and his Master's Degree in Economics and Finance, with a major in Monetary Economics, at the Macquarie University, Australia," the statement added.
Shiller's work can be found in Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Economics Letters, Journal of Econometrics, Journal of Monetary Economics and Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.
1983, "Staggered Prices in a Utility-maximizing Framework," Journal of Monetary Economics 12, 383-398.
He won the 1976 Nobel Prize in economics for his work in monetary economics and related advances in economic theory.
The essays aim to reflect on his contributions to topics ranging from international monetary economics to development policy and their relevance to the challenges faced by the world economy in the wake of the recent global financial crisis.
1995) "The New Monetary Economics and the Theory of Money.
He has been teaching Principles and Intermediate Macro- Micro, International Economics and Monetary Economics and related courses since 1980.
The plan they used could be used here and was simply to have the government pay a percentage of their wages if businesses would agree to hire them for two years and give them a day off to attend the British Colleges of Higher Education such as the one at which I taught monetary economics to such banking students.