money supply

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money supply

n.
The amount of money in the economy. Measures of money supply usually include cash in circulation and current account deposits in banks, but may also include savings deposits or time-restricted deposits.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

money supply

n
(Economics) the total amount of money in a country's economy at a given time. See also M0, M1, M2, M3, M3c, M4, M5
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

money supply

The amount of money in an economy at a given moment. There are various ways in which the money supply can be defined. Narrowly defined, the money supply can mean the coins and bank notes in circulation and bank deposits where money can be withdrawn at short notice. A broader definition will also include savings accounts at banks and possibly bonds and shares.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.money supply - the total stock of money in the economymoney supply - the total stock of money in the economy; currency held by the public plus money in accounts in banks
M1 - a measure of the money supply; includes currency in circulation plus demand deposits or checking account balances
M2 - a measure of the money supply; M1 plus net time deposits (other than large certificates of deposit)
M3 - a measure of the money supply; M2 plus deposits at institutions that are not banks (such as savings and loan associations)
money - the most common medium of exchange; functions as legal tender; "we tried to collect the money he owed us"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

money supply

nliquidità f inv monetaria
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
For the log-log money demand function, the estimated welfare costs are given in the last two columns of Table 3.
Money demand function has always been an important constituent of the macroeconomic models and policy making.
In addition to all of them, our model incorporates nonstandard elements such as a transactions-facilitating money demand and, following Canova and Ferroni (2012), a generalization of the Taylor (1993) rule, where the central bank conducts monetary policy by sluggishly adjusting the short-term nominal interest rate to movements in inflation, the output gap, and the growth rate of nominal money.
Athimuthu's wife Marathi travelled to Malappuram several times to seek forgiveness from Abdul Wajid's family and when latter's wife and two children finally agreed to forgive, the blood money demand of Rs2.5 million became the next stumbling block for Marathi to save her husband from the noose.
This paper empirically analyses India's money demand function during the period 1996 to 2013 using quarterly data.
The money supply is symbolized by M, [L.sub.T](Y) represents money demand for transaction purposes depending on real national income Y, and [L.sub.S](i) represents the money demand for speculation purposes, depending on the interest rate i.
The independent variables for the money demand function include a real income, exchange rate and measure of the interest rate.
disturbance, much money demand, telling lie to get money, long sleeping time, laziness, constipation, irregularities in work and studies.
The study of money demand determinants is very important from a macroeconomics context since this topic determines monetary policies.
One reason that the Great Inflation is an interesting laboratory for economists was the existence of a monetary aggregate (M1) that provided a good measure of the stance (stimulative or contractionary) of monetary policy due to the interest-insensitive nature of real money demand and a stable, albeit lagged, relationship with nominal expenditure.
For example, higher real incomes or declining opportunity costs of holding money generate a higher money demand. This does not increase inflation, as it is in line with fundamental macroeconomic development.
The purpose of the analysis is to see whether the behavior of these time series in this eighty-year period can be explained by standard money demand theory.