money supply

(redirected from Money stock)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to Money stock: M1 Money Supply, M2 Money Supply

money supply

n.
The amount of money in the economy. Measures of money supply usually include cash in circulation and current account deposits in banks, but may also include savings deposits or time-restricted deposits.

money supply

n
(Economics) the total amount of money in a country's economy at a given time. See also M0, M1, M2, M3, M3c, M4, M5

money supply

The amount of money in an economy at a given moment. There are various ways in which the money supply can be defined. Narrowly defined, the money supply can mean the coins and bank notes in circulation and bank deposits where money can be withdrawn at short notice. A broader definition will also include savings accounts at banks and possibly bonds and shares.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.money supply - the total stock of money in the economymoney supply - the total stock of money in the economy; currency held by the public plus money in accounts in banks
M1 - a measure of the money supply; includes currency in circulation plus demand deposits or checking account balances
M2 - a measure of the money supply; M1 plus net time deposits (other than large certificates of deposit)
M3 - a measure of the money supply; M2 plus deposits at institutions that are not banks (such as savings and loan associations)
money - the most common medium of exchange; functions as legal tender; "we tried to collect the money he owed us"
Translations

money supply

nliquidità f inv monetaria
References in classic literature ?
Iron cannot rust, nor beer sour, nor timber rot, nor calicoes go out of fashion, nor money stocks depreciate, in the few swift moments in which the Yankee suffers any one of them to remain in his possession.
i) if [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], the outside option of the firm is binding and the real money stock is equal to [(M/P).
This is because elasticity of the money stock is usually considered necessary over seasonal cycles, while the countercyclical thrust of monetary policy is regarded as appropriate over business cycles.
And the economy would probably have expanded by hundreds of billions of dollars more if the Federal Reserve had not been forced to throttle the growth in the money stock in order to reverse the inflationary spiral of the 1960s and '70s.
As prices are liberalized, this excessive money stock causes high inflation, forming a major obstacle to successful reform.
In October 1979, the Fed changed its operating procedure and began to emphasize a reserve target instead of a Federal Funds target in order to control the money stock.
Muscat, Oct 28 (ONA) The narrow money stock (MI) registered a year-on-year (YoY) decline of 1.
As at the end of October 2014, narrow money stock (M1) when measured on year-on-year basis, grew sharply by 18.
The bank said that its narrow money stock (M1), when measured on year-on-year basis, grew sharply by 30.
The Bank of Japan said that money stock in Japan was up 3.
Classical lender-of-last-resort theory is the notion that the LLR should protect the bank-created money stock from contraction (and expand it to offset falls in velocity) in the lace of bank runs and panics, a duty it performs through pre-announced lending, at a penalty interest rate so as to minimize moral hazard, to creditworthy borrowers offering good collateral.