Mongols

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Mongols

A nomadic central Asian people whose empire under Genghis Khan stretched from China to the Danube.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was initially thought to have been a formal code, enacted by Chinggis Khan either during or soon after his unification of the Mongol people in 1206, but more recently it has come to be regarded as a collection of separate edicts and proclamations made by Chinggis Khan during his lifetime, which were codified during the reign of his heir, Ogodei, around 1229.
Mongolia and Thibet, having freed themselves from the dynasty of the Manchus and separated from China, have formed their own independent States, and, having in view that both States from time immemorial have professed one and the same religion, with a view to strengthening their historic and mutual friendship the Minister for Foreign Affairs, Nikta Biliktu Da-Lama Rabdan, and the Assistant Minister, General and Manlai baatyr beiseh Damdinsurun, as plenipotentiaries of the Government of the ruler of the Mongol people, and gudjir tsanshib kanchenLubsan-Agvan, donir Agvan Choinzin, director of the Bank Ishichjamtso, and the clerk Gendun Galsan, as plenipotentiaries of the Dalai Lama, the ruler of Thibet, have made the following agreement.
From the Abkhazians of the Northwest Caucasus to the Zunghars, a nomadic Mongol people destroyed by the Qing emperors of China, this two-volume encyclopedia contains some 400 entries providing information on the major cultural groups that live and have lived in the Asia- Pacific region from ancient times to the present.
Weatherford takes much of the sting out of the reputation of Genghis Khan and the Mongol people. Unprecedented access to Genghis Khan's homeland and forbidden burial site provided Weatherford with new insight.
`If the logic of the Japanese professor is followed, it is not difficult to arrive at the conclusion that the restoration of the name of Buryatia-Mongolia would be just the first step leading to the unification of all branches of the Mongol people and, inevitably, of all their territories.
The Nagas, a Tibeto-Burman speaking Mongol people, have a predominantly Christian population of around three million.