Mongols


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Mongols

A nomadic central Asian people whose empire under Genghis Khan stretched from China to the Danube.
References in classic literature ?
The one I had selected wavered indecisively before me, and, as I swung wide to make the boarding gentle, filled suddenly and darted away, the smart Mongols shouting a wild rhythm as they bent to the sweeps.
There, probably the same year and the next, he astonished the public with the two parts of 'Tamburlaine the Great,' a dramatization of the stupendous career of the bloodthirsty Mongol fourteenth-century conqueror.
and before that medieval) is the lack of historical perspective which gives to Mongol shepherds the manners and speech of Greek classical antiquity as Marlowe had learned to know it at the university.
Long ago one had borrowed the other's written language, and, untold generations before that, they had diverged from the common Mongol stock.
There were Slavonian hunters, fair-skinned and mighty-muscled; short, squat Finns, with flat noses and round faces; Siberian half-breeds, whose noses were more like eagle- beaks; and lean, slant-eyed men, who bore in their veins the Mongol and Tartar blood as well as the blood of the Slav.
Mongols have a strong oral tradition that is passed from generation to generation - and the sight and sound of the nine-piece band is said to be truly unique and quite extraordinary.
1) Likewise, a fourteenth-century scroll illustrating the invasions, commissioned by a warrior who fought against the Mongols, should be used with care, for its image of an exploding projectile, complete with depictions of hirsute, black-booted Mongols, was added to it over the course of the eighteenth century.
The Mongol Conquests: The Military Operations of Genghis Khan and Sube'etei is a scholarly, detailed history of how the Mongols created the greatest landlocked empire in history, eventually spanning from Korea in the east to Hungary and Poland in the west.
Scholars of history, language, law, religion, and Asia as a region seek to dispel some of the myths about the Mongols and Inner Asia generally by sifting the sources, analyzing their biases, and explicating phrases and passages in the primary texts.
We learn early on that Mongols value physical strength and martial prowess above all else, thus Kublai knows he needs to keep winning in order to appease his court and his subjects.
THE HISTORY OF CENTRAL ASIA: The Age of Islam and the Mongols
Mongols on the Silk Road: Trade, Transportation, and Cross-Cultural Exchange in the Mongol Empire.