monism

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mo·nism

 (mō′nĭz′əm, mŏn′ĭz′əm)
n. Philosophy
1. The view in metaphysics that reality is a unified whole and that all existing things can be ascribed to or described by a single concept or system.
2. The doctrine that mind and matter are formed from, or reducible to, the same ultimate substance or principle of being.

mo′nist n.
mo·nis′tic (mō-nĭs′tĭk, mŏ-) adj.
mo·nis′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

monism

(ˈmɒnɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the doctrine that the person consists of only a single substance, or that there is no crucial difference between mental and physical events or properties. Compare dualism2 See also materialism2, idealism3
2. (Philosophy) philosophy the doctrine that reality consists of an unchanging whole in which change is mere illusion. Compare pluralism5
3. (Philosophy) the epistemological theory that the object and datum of consciousness are identical
4. the attempt to explain anything in terms of one principle only
[C19: from Greek monos single + -ism]
ˈmonist n, adj
moˈnistic, moˈnistical adj
moˈnistically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mon•ism

(ˈmɒn ɪz əm, ˈmoʊ nɪz əm)

n.
1.
a. (in metaphysics) any of various theories holding that there is only one basic substance or principle as the ground of reality or that reality consists of a single element. Compare dualism (def. 2a), pluralism (def. 1a).
b. (in epistemology) a theory that the object and datum of cognition are identical.
2. the reduction of all processes, structures, etc., to a single governing principle.
3. the notion that there is only one causal factor in history.
[1860–65; < German Monismus. See mon-, -ism]
mon′ist, n.
mo•nis•tic (məˈnɪs tɪk, moʊ-) mo•nis′ti•cal, adj.
mo•nis′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

monism

1. Metaphysics. a theory that only one basic substance or principle exists as the ground of reality. Cf. dualism, pluralism.
2. Metaphysics. a theory that reality consists of a single element. Cf. pluralism.
3. Epistemology. a theory that the object and the sense datum of cognition are identical. — monist, n.monistic, monistical, adj.
See also: Philosophy
Epistemology. a theory that the object and datum of cognition are identical.
See also: Knowledge
Metaphysics. any of various theories holding that there is only one basic substance or principle that is the ground of reality. — monist, n. — monistic, monistical, adj.
See also: Matter
the theory that there is only one causal factor in history, as intellect or nature. — monist, n. — monistic, adj.
See also: History
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

monism

The belief that all things are unified, or that they are all explained ultimately on one single principle or law.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monism - the doctrine that reality consists of a single basic substance or element
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
pluralism - the doctrine that reality consists of several basic substances or elements
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Norton's another monist - only he affirms naught but spirit.
* An idealistic monist who long puzzled the philosophers of that time with his denial of the existence of matter, but whose clever argument was finally demolished when the new empiric facts of science were philosophically generalized.
The instigators were Hanball and Shafi'i critics of Sufi Monists, the heirs of the Andalusian Sufi master Ibn al-'Arabi (d.
While monists and pluralists claim to be different, they both accept modernist philosophy and the fundamental belief in the importance of science.
The swamping problem for truth monism appears to make this position indefensible, at least for those monists who maintain the superiority of knowledge to merely true belief.
168) and states that "Neo-, Cultural Nationalist- and Modern Confucians are ontological monists, stressing the unity (in fact the oneness and identity) between Heaven and humanity.
(172) Starita also identifies this dichotomy, describing the schools as 'dualists' and 'monists'.
Discussion encompasses the monists, the skeptics, clashes of values, the challenge of free exercise, and an approach to conflict resolution that uses doctrinal and social history as guides.
(106) International law, according to most monists,
Our forebears were probably monists, insisting on a single truth; they would likely have mistaken our pluralism for relativism, now canonised in the phrase of Gen Y as 'Whatever turns you on'.
Yet, they appeal in passing (without explanation) to the "philosophical resources" available to monists to account for the intermediate state, or, relatedly, sameness of person after death, and even after the resurrection (p.
As is the case with all mental phenomena, the questions about just how and where the unconscious might be are associated with the mind-body problem that distinguishes monists and dualists.