baobab

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ba·o·bab

 (bā′ō-băb′, bä′-)
n.
Any of several trees of the genus Adansonia of Africa, Madagascar, and Australia, especially the tropical African species A. digitata, having palmately compound leaves, edible gourdlike fruits, and a broad trunk that stores water.

[New Latin bahobab, possibly from North African Arabic *būḥibab, fruit of many seeds, from Arabic 'abū ḥibāb, source of seeds : 'ab, father, source; see ʔb in Semitic roots + ḥibāb, pl. of ḥabb, seed.]

baobab

(ˈbeɪəʊˌbæb)
n
(Plants) a bombacaceous tree, Adansonia digitata, native to Africa, that has a very thick trunk, large white flowers, and a gourdlike fruit with an edible pulp called monkey bread. Also called: bottle tree or monkey bread tree
[C17: probably from a native African word]

ba•o•bab

(ˈbeɪ oʊˌbæb, ˈbɑ oʊ-, ˈbaʊ bæb)

n.
a large tropical African tree, Adansoniadigitata, of the bombax family, that has an extremely thick trunk and bears a gourdlike fruit.
[1630–40; < New Latin bahobab]

ba·o·bab

(bā′ō-băb′)
An African tree having a large trunk, bulbous branches, and hard-shelled fruit with an edible pulp. The baobab has spongy wood that holds large amounts of water, and the bark can be used to make rope, mats, paper, and other items. Baobabs can live up to 3,000 years.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baobab - African tree having an exceedingly thick trunk and fruit that resembles a gourd and has an edible pulp called monkey breadbaobab - African tree having an exceedingly thick trunk and fruit that resembles a gourd and has an edible pulp called monkey bread
monkey bread, sour gourd - African gourd-like fruit with edible pulp
Adansonia, genus Adansonia - baobab; cream-of-tartar tree
angiospermous tree, flowering tree - any tree having seeds and ovules contained in the ovary
Translations
apinanleipäpuubaobab
apabrauðstré
References in periodicals archive ?
LAWTON Texoma, a feature film by Cameron University faculty member Matt Jenkins, was named Best Feature Made for less than $5,000 by the Monkey Bread Tree Film Awards, a juried competition for independent films.
Projects such as bee-keeping, chicken raising, making juice from the fruit of the monkey bread tree, and growing vegetable gardens have been met with enthusiasm in a major charcoal producing region, the southern district of Mwanza.