monoamine oxidase inhibitor

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monoamine oxidase inhibitor

n. Abbr. MAOI
Any of a class of antidepressant drugs that block the action of monoamine oxidase in the brain, thereby allowing the accumulation of monoamine neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine and serotonin.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

monoamine oxidase inhibitor

n
(Biochemistry) biochem an agent that inhibits the action of monoamine oxidase. Such inhibitors are used in the treatment of depression. Abbreviation: MAOI
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mon′oamine′ ox′idase inhib`itor


n.
any of various substances that block enzymatic breakdown of certain monoamine neurotransmitters and that are used to treat depression. Abbr.: MAOI
[1960–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monoamine oxidase inhibitor - any of a group of antidepressant drugs that inhibit the action of monoamine oxidase in the brain and so allow monoamines to accumulatemonoamine oxidase inhibitor - any of a group of antidepressant drugs that inhibit the action of monoamine oxidase in the brain and so allow monoamines to accumulate
antidepressant, antidepressant drug - any of a class of drugs used to treat depression; often have undesirable side effects
iproclozide - an antidepressant drug that acts as a monoamine oxidase inhibitor
isocarboxazid, Marplan - a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (trade name Marplan) that is used to treat clinical depression
Nardil, phenelzine - monoamine oxidase inhibitor (trade name Nardil) used to treat clinical depression
tranylcypromine - an antidepressant drug that is a monoamine oxidase inhibitor; administered as a sulfate
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References in periodicals archive ?
Qsymia (phentermine and topiramate extended-release) capsules CIV is contraindicated in pregnancy; in patients with glaucoma; in hyperthyroidism; in patients receiving treatment or within 14 days following treatment with monoamine oxidase inhibitors; or in patients with hypersensitivity to sympathomimetic amines, topiramate, or any of the inactive ingredients in Qsymia.
Concomitant use of esketamine with monoamine oxidase inhibitors may increase blood pressure.
The five classes of drugs used most commonly for feline anxiety disorders are azapirones, benzodiazepines, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.
A vast majority of pharmacological agents alter serotonin levels (Table 1), of which the most common would be selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) both of which are used primarily for the treatment of depression.
Do not use in cats with a known hypersensitivity to mirtazapine or any of the excipients or in cats treated with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs).
The research, 'Discovery of Novel Plant Derived Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors as Potential Neuroprotective Agents' was conducted under the supervision of CPH Associate Professor of Medicinal Chemistry Dr Ashraf Khalil.
Arbuthnott, "Effects of selective monoamine oxidase inhibitors on the in vivo release and metabolism of dopamine in the rat striatum," Journal of Neurochemistry, vol.
The usual drugs used are from three groups: TCAs (tricyclic antidepressants), MAOIs (monoamine oxidase inhibitors) and SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors).
By product type, the market is sub-segmented into Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs), Atypical Antipsychotics, Tricyclic Antidepressants, Tetracyclic Antidepressants (TeCAs), Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs), Benzodiazepines, Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors, and others.
Tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are typically not prescribed as initial treatment because of safety concerns and adverse effects.
e Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOls) are antidepressants that work by blocking the effect of a specific brain enzyme and boosting levels of key neurotransmitters associated with elevated mood.
Tipton, "The therapeutic potential of monoamine oxidase inhibitors," Nature Reviews.