laser

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laser

la·ser

 (lā′zər)
n.
1.
a. Any of several devices that emit highly amplified and coherent radiation of one or more discrete wavelengths. One of the most common lasers makes use of atoms in a metastable energy state, which, as they decay to a lower energy level, stimulate others to decay, resulting in a cascade of emitted radiation.
b. A beam of radiation emitted by a laser.
2. Sports A ball or puck sent in a straight line at high speed: shot a laser into the upper right corner of the goal.

[l(ight) a(mplification by) s(timulated) e(mission of) r(adiation).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

laser

(ˈleɪzə)
n
1. (General Physics) a source of high-intensity optical, infrared, or ultraviolet radiation produced as a result of stimulated emission maintained within a solid, liquid, or gaseous medium. The photons involved in the emission process all have the same energy and phase so that the laser beam is monochromatic and coherent, allowing it to be brought to a fine focus
2. (General Physics) any similar source producing a beam of any electromagnetic radiation, such as infrared or microwave radiation
vb (tr)
3. to use a laser on (something), esp as part of medical treatment
4. (often foll by off) to remove (a tattoo, fat, etc) with laser treatment
[C20: from light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation]

Laser

(ˈleɪzə)
n
trademark a type of dinghy, designed to be sailed by one person
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

la•ser

(ˈleɪ zər)

n.
a device that produces a nearly parallel, nearly monochromatic, and coherent beam of light by exciting atoms and causing them to radiate their energy in phase.
Compare maser.
[1955–60; l(ightwave) a(mplification by) s(timulated) e(mission of) r(adiation)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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la·ser

(lā′zər)
A device that emits a very narrow and intense beam of light or other radiation. The light is generated by exciting the atoms of a medium, such as a crystal, gas, or liquid. The color of laser light depends on the level to which the atoms of the medium become excited. Lasers are used for many purposes, such as cutting hard substances and destroying diseased tissue.
Did You Know? A laser emits a thin, intense beam of light that can travel long distances without diffusing or spreading out very much. Almost any light beam consists of many waves traveling in roughly the same direction. In laser light, the waves are all precisely in step with each other. Such light is called coherent. Lasers produce coherent light through a process called stimulated emission. The laser contains a chamber in which atoms of a medium such as a synthetic ruby rod or a gas are excited to a high energy level. When a light wave of the correct frequency is sent through the chamber from an electronic flash tube, it makes the excited atoms emit light that is in step with the original wave. These waves then stimulate other atoms to emit more coherent light. The chamber has mirrors at both ends, so the light travels back and forth, repeatedly stimulating emission. One of the mirrors is partially transparent so that the laser beam can exit from that end.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

laser

Any device that can produce or amplify optical radiation primarily by the process of controlled stimulated emission. A laser may emit electromagnetic radiation from the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum through the infrared portion. Also, an acronym for "light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation."
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.laser - an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiationlaser - an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation; an optical device that produces an intense monochromatic beam of coherent light
optical device - a device for producing or controlling light
photocoagulator - surgical instrument containing a laser for use in photocoagulation
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
أشِعَّة ليزرلِيّزَرْ
laserlaserový
laserlaser-
laser
laser
lézer
leysigeislileysirleysir, leysigeisli
レーザー
레이저
lazerinis spausdintuvaslazeris
lāzera-lāzers
laser
laserlaserový
laser
laser
แสงเลเซอร์
la-delaser

laser

[ˈleɪzəʳ]
A. Nláser m
B. CPD laser beam Nrayo m láser
laser gun Npistola f de rayos láser
laser printer Nimpresora f láser
laser surgery Ncirujía f con láser
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

laser

[ˈleɪzər]
nlaser m
modif [technology] → laser inv; [surgery, treatment] → laser inv laser lightlaser beam nrayon m laserlaser disc laser disk ndisque m laserlaser disc player nplatine f laserlaser light nlumière f laserlaser printer nimprimante f laserlaser show nspectacle m laser
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

laser

nLaser m; (Comput: = printer) → Laserdrucker m

laser

in cpdsLaser-;
laser beam
nLaserstrahl m
laser disc
nLaserdisc f, → Laserdisk f
laser gun
nLaserkanone for -pistole f
laser medicine
nLasermedizin f
laser printer
nLaserdrucker m
laser show
nLasershow f
laser surgery
laser technology
nLasertechnik f
laser weapon
nLaserwaffe f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

laser

[ˈleɪzəʳ] nlaser m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

laser

(ˈleizə) noun
(an instrument that produces) a narrow and very intense beam of light. The men were cutting the sheets of metal with a laser; (also adjective) a laser beam.
ˈlaser printer noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

laser

لِيّزَرْ laser laser Laser λέιζερ láser laser laser laser laser レーザー 레이저 laser laser laser laser лазер laser แสงเลเซอร์ lazer laser 激光
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

la·ser

n. laser.
1. sigla del inglés “Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation” (amplificación de la luz por estimulación de emisión de radiación);
2. bisturí microquirúrgico usado en la cauterización de tumores.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

laser

n láser m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The technology relies on Raman spectroscopy, a technique that involves shining a monochromatic light from a laser on a sample and measuring the intensity of the scattered light.
The quantum yield of the photochemical oxidation of ascorbic acid with methylene green was determined by irradiation of reaction mixture by monochromatic light of 657 nm and transmitted light was recorded by photocell response as electrical signals on galvanometer.
25 (Petra)-- Scientists at the pioneering SESAME light source saw First Monochromatic Light through the XAFS/XRF (X-ray absorption fine structure/X-ray fluorescence) spectroscopy beamline, signaling the start of the laboratory's experimental program.
Supplied through Photonic Solutions in the UK, Sciencetech's family of computer-controlled Tunable Light Sources (TLS) are pre-aligned, pre-assembled illumination systems capable of outputting monochromatic light for use in optical spectroscopy, photochemistry and solar cell quantum efficiency measurements.
This recorded holographic image (or H1 as it is sometimes referred to) can then be viewed in transmission by looking through it, with a laser beam or other monochromatic light source at the same wavelength as the recording laser, illuminating light from behind the master.
Among the experiments themselves are to determine the wavelength of monochromatic light (sodium light) by Newton's ring, to determine the specific rotation of cane sugar solutions using half-shade polarimeter, to verify Stefan's Law by electric method using a vacuum diode, to determine the energy band gap of a given extrinsic semi-conductor material by thermal variation using a four probe method, and to determine the coefficient of viscosity of a water by Meyer's disc method.
Testing was a simple matter of placing his convex surface inside the concave reference surface and looking for interference fringes under monochromatic light. (Fluorescent or laser light sources work well for this.) With spacers between the surfaces you get a bull's-eye pattern, and by pressing on the edge of the lens and watching which direction the fringes move, you can tell whether your curve is too shallow or too steep.
[18, 20] indicated that the number and distribution of M-cones changes with monochromatic light. In our research, we further investigated the relationship between changes of cone densities and refractive development in monochromatic light.
Because a lens has different refractive indices for various frequencies of light, the direction of transmission of a monochromatic light is different after sunlight enters the lens, so it disperses when leaving the lens, and the colors are arranged in a certain order to form spectra.
In theoretical calculations of some property of monochromatic light scattered from, or transmitted through, a randomly rough surface, such as the angular or spatial dependence of its intensity, what is actually calculated is the average of that property over the ensemble of realizations of the random surface profile.