monochromy

Related to monochromy: monochromatic

monochromy

(ˈmɒnəˈkrəʊmɪ)
n
(Art Terms) art the skill of painting or sketching using only a single colour
References in periodicals archive ?
Viewers confronted examples of an abstraction that is rigorous but never neutral, characterized by experimentation with unusual techniques and materials, and moving between monochromy and construction, between chance and organization.
The white-black monochromy serves here the attempt of revealing the sacred.
Kusama is a shape-shifter whose self-invention and continual reinvention have yielded an oeuvre that moves from very early, Surrealist-inflected paintings of the 1950s, to the austere proto-minimal monochromy of the "infinity nets" (her close friend Donald Judd was one of the first people to buy one, in 1959) that allied her with, among others, the European groups Zero and Nul, to what Frances Morris has aptly characterized as the "vivid, shocking and at the same time comic" (12) phallic accumulations first shown at the Green Gallery in 1962, to guerilla Pop and psychedelic performances to the mirrored installations and hallucinatory pumpkin patches she is known for today.
At times, he uses the monochromy widespread in sculpture to emphasise the plasticity of the sculpture or else he enters into chromatic description with the use of majolica and combines two, three or more colours in specific different parts of the sculpture.
Not a smell, not a style, not even drabness nor monochromy exactly.
In the views of the painter Yves Klein Vostrak found much that was close to his own: the symbolism of the trio of basic colours in Klein's monochromy strikingly corresponds to Vostrak's thoughts on the principles of form and the radicalism of a work like Trias has affinities with the aesthetics of contrast between colour surfaces in painting.
In place of the old opposition between "the monochromy of the post-imperial imagination," "nationalist histories of a unified people," and "the pointillism of the new Indian historians" searching for "examples of 'resistance' (textual and practical) to the ideas of the nation and the state," he proposes "new routes, that do not altogether abandon the terrain of political history, but recount it in different terms" (3).
Monochromy had been available for literary exploitation since at least 1760, when Laurence Sterne displayed a black square as an emblem of death in Chapter 12 of Tristram Shandy.
Only in one of the paintings here, Conjunction 79-11, 1979, are two shades of paint used; the others hew to monochromy, or would do so were it not for the fact that the brown of the canvas counts as a second color.
The Paradoxical Absolute is far from a painting someone unsympathetic to monochromy might compare to a blank wall--Ryman did not begin his all-over white squares until the middle sixties.
Blue water fills the frame, punctuated by blue cans; the near monochromy of the work (counterpointed only by the bodies) has an acidic affect.
Well, Kim's work won't answer that question, and at its best it has made a slight contribution to the theory of monochromy as a painting gesture.