monoculture

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mon·o·cul·ture

 (mŏn′ə-kŭl′chər)
n.
1. The cultivation of a single crop on a farm or in a region or country.
2. A single, homogeneous culture without diversity or dissension.

mon′o·cul′tur·al adj.
mon′o·cul′tur·al·ism n.

monoculture

(ˈmɒnəʊˌkʌltʃə)
n
(Agriculture) the continuous growing of one type of crop

mon•o•cul•ture

(ˈmɒn əˌkʌl tʃər)

n.
the use of land for growing only one type of crop.
[1910–15]
mon′o•cul`tur•al, adj.

monoculture

the use of land for the cultivation of only one type of crop. — monocultural, adj.
See also: Agriculture

monoculture

Extensive cultivation of one crop. It maximizes use of farm machinery, but increases risks of crop disease, pest infestation, and impaired soil structure.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monoculture - the cultivation of a single crop (on a farm or area or country)
culture - the raising of plants or animals; "the culture of oysters"
Translations
monocultuur

monoculture

[ˈmɒnəʊˌkʌltʃəʳ] Nmonocultivo m

monoculture

[ˈmɒnəʊˌkʌltʃəʳ] nmonocoltura
References in periodicals archive ?
In this talk she will draw on her personal experiences as a field researcher in Indonesia to discuss tropical peatlands and the challenges that these vital habitats face: from increasing human populations, devastating yearly fires, to oil palm monocultures.
In Britain the EU-wide DIVERSIFY project is being led by the Organic Research Centre, which believes cereal/legume mixtures could produce 30% higher yields than monocultures.
Sugar monocultures have also had a tremendous environmental impact.
However, yields of rice cultivated on alluvial clay soil in monocultures with three harvests per year are declining in the Mekong Delta, even though farmers yearly add more fertiliser (Khoa 2002; Linh et al.
Monocultures of corn and soybean and intercropping treatments with various crop combination ratio, were significantly different in terms of silage nutritive parameters (Table 2).
In addition, it is an applicable and accessible technology that results in few environmental impacts compared to those of monocultures (REZENDE et al.
The essays are grouped in sections on transculturalism and migration, articulating the globalized present and resistance, and monocultures and dislocations.
Monocultures in nature and their analog, groupthink in the social realm, make populations weaker and more vulnerable to threats.
In monocultures 1000 viable seeds per m2 for forbs and legume swards and 5000 viable seeds per m2 for grass swards were sown.