Monosulphide


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Mon`o`sul´phide


n.1.(Chem.) A sulphide containing one atom of sulphur, and analogous to a monoxide; - contrasted with a polysulphide; as, galena is a monosulphide.
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So annealing did not lead to large changes in the composition of the films; the annealed CdS/SnS films maintained their initial stoichiometric composition of tin monosulphide. Annealing at 460[degrees]C caused the tin composition of films to increase, probably because more sulphur is lost during annealing at higher temperatures.
It has been found [6, 8, 10, 11] that the conventional hydrochloric /hydrofluoric acid treatment is effective for removing most carbonate, oxide, and monosulphide minerals from sedimentary rocks and leaves kerogen and pyrite largely unaffected.
while at pH [5-8], the anoxic formation of Fe monosulphide was reported (dos Santos Afonso and Stumm, 1992; Peiffer et al., 1992; Yao and Millero, 1996; Poulton et al., 2004)
The conformation of the molecule is similar to that of thiram monosulphide and even more so that of several sulphides.
Rickard DT (1997) Kinetics of pyrite formation by the [H.sub.2]S oxidation of iron (II) monosulphide in aqueous solutions between 25 and 125[degrees]C: The rate equation.
Rickard DT, Luther GW, III (1997) Kinetics of pyrite formation by the [H.sub.2]S oxidation of iron (II) monosulphide in aqueous solutions between 25 and 125[degrees]C: The mechanism.
The conventional hydrochloric/hydrofluoric acid treatment is effective for removing most of the carbonate, oxide, and monosulphide minerals from the sedimentary rocks and it leaves kerogen and pyrite largely unaffected [12,13].
During these conversions the ferric monosulphide (pyrrhotite) FeS is formed as an intermediate product, which has a very important role in boiler water-wall tube fouling processes [4].
In conditions when calcium oxide and ferric monosulphide are simultaneously transported onto the surface, the following sulphation reaction is possible:
Although controversial, the general consensus is that framboids may grow with bacterial involvement, and that their spheroidal shape is determined by colloidal-scale magnetic and electric properties of their precursor iron monosulphides. A range of stages of development of massive crystalline aggregates is observed in the samples: individual microcrysts, framboids, framboid clusters, recrystallized megacryst overgrowths, and banded concentric zones.