cloud forest

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cloud forest

n.
A high-elevation tropical forest that receives much of its moisture from direct contact with clouds rather than from rain.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydrological observations in montane rain forests on Gunung Silam.
Large-scale diversity patterns of vascular epiphytes in Neotropical montane rain forests. Journal of Biogeography, 31, 1477-1487.
The property includes the largest and least disturbed remaining areas of the submontane and montane rain forests of Sri Lanka which are a global conservation priority on many accounts.
[3] showed that fine litterfall declined with increasing altitude in montane rain forests, the mean annual total fine litterfall per plot (2003-2005) was negatively correlated with plot altitude (r = -0.45, P = 0.03).
Lodge DJ, Scatena FN, Asbury CE, Sanchez MJ (1991) Fine litter fall and related nutrient input resulting from Hurricane Hugo in subtropical wet and lower montane rain forests of Puerto Rico.
The decomposition of leaf litter in Jamaican montane rain forests. Journal of Ecology 69:263-276.
The tropical forests of China in the strict sense do not include tropical monsoon forests (Zhu, 2011) but include tropical rain forests in lowlands and tropical montane rain forests, which were classified as a sub-type of forest (Wu, 1987; Zhu, 2006; Zhu et al., 2015a).
Bellingham & Sparrow (2009) point out that steep slopes affect the vegetation of montane rain forests by increased ground surface disturbance and decreased availability of nitrogen.
Although trees in upper montane rain forests growing on very shallow soils have been reported to die following severe droughts (Lowry et al.
inhabit cloud forests, montane rain forests, and tropical deciduous forests, where they are threatened due to habitat destruction and
Four montane rain forests of Jamaica: a quantitative characterization of the floristics, the soils and the foliar mineral levels, and a discussion of the interrelations.