Montenegro

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Montenegro

Mon·te·neg·ro

 (mŏn′tə-nĕg′rō, -nē′grō)
A country of the western Balkan Peninsula bordering on the Adriatic Sea. An ancient Balkan state, it was at various times under Ottoman Muslim and theocratic Christian rule before becoming an independent kingdom (1910-1918). Montenegro then joined the newly formed Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, which became Yugoslavia after 1929. In 1991, four of the six Yugoslav republics declared independence, leaving Montenegro and Serbia as the sole constituents of a reorganized federal republic. Yugoslavia changed its name to Serbia and Montenegro in 2003 and dissolved the union altogether in 2006. Podgorica is the capital and largest city.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Montenegro

(ˌmɒntɪˈniːɡrəʊ)
n
(Placename) a republic in S central Europe, bordering on the Adriatic; declared a kingdom in 1910 and united with Serbia, Croatia, and other territories in 1918 to form Yugoslavia; remained united with Serbia as the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia when the other Yugoslav constituent republics became independent in 1991–92; Union of Serbia and Montenegro formed in 2003 and dissolved 2006. Mainly mountainous. Language: Serbian (Montenegrin). Religion: Orthodox Christian majority. Currency: euro. Capital: Podgorica. Pop: 653 474 (2013 est). Area: 13 812 sq km (5387 sq miles)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Mon•te•ne•gro

(ˌmɒn təˈni groʊ, -ˈnɛg roʊ)

n.
a constituent republic of Yugoslavia, in the SW part. 615,267; 5333 sq. mi. (13,812 sq. km). Cap.: Podgorica.
Mon`te•ne′grin (-ˈni grɪn, -ˈnɛg rɪn) adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Montenegro - a former country bordering on the Adriatic SeaMontenegro - a former country bordering on the Adriatic Sea; now part of the Union of Serbia and Montenegro
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Jugoslavija, Serbia and Montenegro, Union of Serbia and Montenegro, Yugoslavia - a mountainous republic in southeastern Europe bordering on the Adriatic Sea; formed from two of the six republics that made up Yugoslavia until 1992; Serbia and Montenegro were known as the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia until 2003 when they adopted the name of the Union of Serbia and Montenegro
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Montenegro

Montenegro

[mɔntəˈniːgrəʊ] NMontenegro m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Montenegro

nMontenegro nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
She knew all the statesmen of that region, Turks, Bulgarians, Montenegrins, Roumanians, Greeks, Armenians, and nondescripts, young and old, the living and the dead.
But Di Giovanni soon learned that if there were no heroes in the saga, there were certainly plenty of victims: Muslims, Christian Kosovons, Montenegrins, and even many of the dominant Serbs.
Zarko Savic, a senior official at the court in Podgorica, Montenegro's capital, alleged that Sunday Mirror reporter Dominic Hipkins, 27, and four Montenegrins made up a story with the intention of harming the country's reputation.
At a meeting of Montenegrin clan leaders to decide what to do with those Montenegrins who had become Moslems, it was concluded that their extermination was the best method of combatting the Turkish menace.
The author conveys a proud message about Montenegrins, who are fearless and unmatched fighters, resembling heroes from folk poetry.
After 90 minutes of talks at the Montenegrin seaside resort of Sveti Stefan, both the Montenegrins and members of the Serbian ultra-nationalist Radical Party admitted they had "completely different" stands on the future of Yugoslavia.
Despite strong economic growth, both Serbs and Montenegrins express dissatisfaction with their standard of living and employment situation.
The EU was facing up to life with an extra potential member on its doorstep as Montenegrins voted on 21 May for independence from Serbia.
They are all "Slavs" but within this group there are Croats, Serbs, Albanians, Montenegrins, Christians, Moslems, et al.
A look at Serbs' and Montenegrins' views of their national institutions shows that though the two populations are attitudinally similar in many cases, Montenegrins are currently more likely to have confidence in their country's government and leadership than Serbs.
Montenegrins, according to the ICG, are more likely than not to vote in April 2006 to break away from Serbia.