moonflower

(redirected from Moon flower)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

moon·flow·er

 (mo͞on′flou′ər)
n.
Any of several vines of the genus Ipomoea having trumpet-shaped flowers that open at night.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

moonflower

(ˈmuːnˌflaʊə)
n
1. (Plants) any of several night-blooming convolvulaceous plants, esp the white-flowered Calonyction (or Ipomoea) aculeatum
2. (Plants) Also called: angels' tears a Mexican solanaceous plant, Datura suaveolens, planted in the tropics for its white night-blooming flowers
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

moon•flow•er

(ˈmunˌflaʊ ər)

n.
any of various vines of the morning glory family, having fragrant white flowers that bloom at night.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moonflower - pantropical climber having white fragrant nocturnal flowersmoonflower - pantropical climber having white fragrant nocturnal flowers
morning glory - any of various twining vines having funnel-shaped flowers that close late in the day
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Moon Flower" by Neil Perry Gordon is an epic tale that follows Lukas, a young boy in the Dutch controlled territory of New Amsterdam, as he meets chiefs, shamans, warriors, and the English army on his quest to seek a connection with the Great Spirit.
Aigul, or moon flower, is a species of flowering plant in the lily family, native to Central Asia.
Unable to fulfil it, they are caught by the gnome who transforms the Princess into a moon flower rooted in the ground.
I never thought I would look at a moon flower in December, or pansies in January.