Moors


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moor 1

 (mo͝or)
v. moored, moor·ing, moors
v.tr.
1. To make fast (a vessel, for example) by means of cables, anchors, or lines: moor a ship to a dock; a dirigible moored to a tower.
2. To fix in place; secure: a mailbox moored to the sidewalk with bolts. See Synonyms at fasten.
3. To provide with an abiding emotional attachment: a politician moored to the family back home.
v.intr.
1. To secure a vessel or aircraft with lines or anchors.
2. To be secured with lines or anchors: The freighter moored alongside the wharf.

[Middle English moren.]

moor 2

 (mo͝or)
n.
An uncultivated area covered with low-growing vegetation and often high but poorly drained.

[Middle English mor, from Old English mōr.]

Moor

 (mo͝or)
n.
1. A member of a traditionally Muslim people of mixed Berber and Arab ancestry, now living chiefly in northwest Africa.
2. One of the Muslims who invaded Spain in the 8th century and established a civilization in Andalusia that lasted until the late 15th century.

[Middle English More, from Old French, from Medieval Latin Mōrus, from Latin Maurus, Mauritanian, from Greek Mauros.]

Moors

Muslims of mixed Berber and Arab descent conquering Spain 711–1492.
References in classic literature ?
The Moors of Aragon are called Tagarins in Barbary, and those of Granada Mudejars; but in the Kingdom of Fez they call the Mudejars Elches, and they are the people the king chiefly employs in war.
The first person I met was her father, who addressed me in the language that all over Barbary and even in Constantinople is the medium between captives and Moors, and is neither Morisco nor Castilian, nor of any other nation, but a mixture of all languages, by means of which we can all understand one another.
There are stalwart Bedouins of the desert here, and stately Moors proud of a history that goes back to the night of time; and Jews whose fathers fled hither centuries upon centuries ago; and swarthy Riffians from the mountains--born cut-throats--and original, genuine Negroes as black as Moses; and howling dervishes and a hundred breeds of Arabs--all sorts and descriptions of people that are foreign and curious to look upon.
The Phoenicians, the Carthagenians, the English, Moors, Romans, all have battled for Tangier--all have won it and lost it.
However, to cut short this melancholy part of our story, our ship being disabled, and three of our men killed, and eight wounded, we were obliged to yield, and were carried all prisoners into Sallee, a port belonging to the Moors.
It happened that he had appointed to go out in this boat, either for pleasure or for fish, with two or three Moors of some distinction in that place, and for whom he had provided extraordinarily, and had, therefore, sent on board the boat overnight a larger store of provisions than ordinary; and had ordered me to get ready three fusees with powder and shot, which were on board his ship, for that they designed some sport of fowling as well as fishing.
A broil with the Moors. They arrive at the plain of salt.
This usage, with some differences we had with a Moor, made us very desirous of leaving this country, but we were still put off with one pretence or other whenever we asked leave to depart.
"I find that before the terrible event occurred several people had seen a creature upon the moor which corresponds with this Baskerville demon, and which could not possibly be any animal known to science.
We are blinded by mist; we are lost on a moor; and the treacherou s peat-bogs are round us in every direction!
She was not at all a timid child and she was not exactly frightened, but she felt that there was no knowing what might happen in a house with a hundred rooms nearly all shut up--a house standing on the edge of a moor.
That sense of a dungeon, that sense of a horrible and degrading misfortune overtaking a creature fair to see and safe to trust, attaches only to ships moored in the docks of great European ports.