Moral Rearmament


Also found in: Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Moral Rearmament

n
(Alternative Belief Systems) a worldwide movement for moral and spiritual renewal founded by Frank Buchman in 1938. Also called: Buchmanism Former name: Oxford Group

Moral Rearmament

A Christian revival movement founded in 1938 by the German-American evangelist, Frank Buchman.
References in periodicals archive ?
(6) One of the best accounts of the relationship between Kerr-Jarrett and the Moral Rearmament Movement can be found in the book by Frank Jan Van Dijk.
Symptoms of crisis included Cellorigo's Politica necessaria y util restauracion (1600); continuous rebellions in the Spanish Netherlands (1566-1648), calling for costly and exhausting military intervention; upsurge of significant Protestant communities in Valladolid, seat of the royal court 1601-1609, and in other important cities; the expulsion of the moriscos (1609); administrative reforms; formation of the Junta de Reformacion de las Costumbres (1622) as an instrument of moral rearmament of the public; British attack on Cadiz (1626); aggressive foreign politics during the rule of Count-Duke of Olivares, the king's privado from 1621 to 1643; third bankruptcy of the state (in 1627, first two bankruptcies in 1557 and 1575); and Spain's intervention in the Thirty Years' War.
Alexander Smith, a member of the Foreign Relations Committee and convert to Frank Buchman's Moral Rearmament movement, documents Smith's diary entries recording daily communications from God on specific foreign policy issues.
He was thrashed in the Wimbledon final by American Don Budge, winning only four games in the entire match, and promptly quit the sport to concentrate on working for the faith-based Moral Rearmament movement.
You try moral rearmament. Here Weigel is on to something.
Doherty's premise is that one must view both BHD and WWS in the context of the "moral rearmament" of America following 9/11.
We have been dubious of moral rearmament, Christian perfectionism, church-growth schemes, and alienated mentalities.
Moreover, in this aforementioned epilogue, Podhoretz takes great pains to show that there is no utility in converting the prophets into latter-day spokesmen for moral rearmament. The prophets, he emphasizes, must be seen in terms of their own history, geography, and self-understanding.
Wyman shows us at the outset that this presidential call for "Moral Rearmament," which insisted that the underlying strength of the world was in the "moral fiber of her citizens," was not only ineffectual but also was never based on any firm ground of morality at all.