Mordvin

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Related to Mordvins: Udmurts, Mordvin people, Mordvinia

Mordvin

(ˈmɔːdvɪn)
npl -vin or -vins
1. (Peoples) a member of a Finnish people of the middle Volga region, living chiefly in the Mordvinian Republic
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Finno-Ugric family
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mordvin - a member of the agricultural people living in the central Volga provinces of European Russia
Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic, Soviet Russia, Russia - formerly the largest Soviet Socialist Republic in the USSR occupying eastern Europe and northern Asia
Russian - a native or inhabitant of Russia
2.Mordvin - the Finnic language spoken by the Mordvinians
Volgaic - a group of Finnic languages spoken around the Volga river
References in periodicals archive ?
Expeditions organized by the educated tsars, Peter I and Catherine II--with effective support from the part of the academy that was founded in 1725--completed the geographic-topographic description of the empire, worked up a systematic taxonomy of the flora and the fauna, and at the same time, collected a substantial body of ethnographic and linguistic data about the yet unknown peoples of the eastern regions, for example the Mordvins.
This stands to reason, since with the development of a new administrative system, the spreading of Christianity and the new way of life becoming general subsequent to the Russian conquest, the Mordvins had to get acquainted with a number of new concepts, and they also had to name them in some way.
Mordvin written records have not been much treated by linguists to the present: the only person describing these texts in a monographic manner is the renowned Moksha linguist, Aleksandr Pavlovich Feoktistov ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 1968a; 1971; 1976); it was also him who wrote essays about this topic ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 1963; 1968b; Feoktistov 1971-1972; 1975a) and introductions to handbooks (1966: 177, 199; 1975b : 262-265; 1980: 5-8).
The present essay overviews the first period of Mordvin lexicography, from Witsen's 1692 Dutch-Mordvin glossary containing 324 words to bishop Damaskin's 1785 dictionary containing 11,000 entries.
Issues of Mordvin neologistic tendencies are treated with special attention--novel words appearing chiefly in the dictionary of Damaskin (and his colleagues) are described with particular care.
Total and Percentage of Ethnic Minorities in Estonia by their Mother Tongue in 2000 Mother tongue of Other mother ethnic affiliation tongue Armenians 711 729 Azeris 580 293 Bashkirs 51 101 Byelorussians 4953 12270 Chuvashs 230 262 Georgians 187 242 Ingrian Finns 124 234 Jews 124 2011 Karelians 99 327 Kasakhs 26 101 Komis 53 85 Koreans 34 134 Latvians 1242 1082 Lezgins 69 52 Lithuanians 1147 965 Maris 114 129 Moldovians 308 335 Mordvins 221 339 Ossetians 44 72 Tatars 1229 1351 Udmurts 95 145 Ukrainians 11923 17044 Uzbeks 54 77 Source: Statistics Estonia.
Total of members in cultural societies of ethnic minorities in 2008 Ethnic group Total of members Total of ethnic group * Armenians 163 1,444 Azeris N/A 880 Bashkirs N/A 152 Byelorussians 129 17,241 Chuvashs 106 495 Germans 950 1,870 Jews 2,707 2,145 Georgians 38 430 Kabardins 35 14 Koreans 88 169 Latvians N/A 2,330 Lithuanians 260 2,116 Maris N/A 245 Moldovans N/A 645 Mordvins 34 562 Ossetians 20 116 Tatars 166 2,582 Turkmens 8 36 Udmurts 35 241 Ukrainians 1,572 29,012 Uzbeks 10 132 TOTAL 6,321 59,954 * The total of the ethnic group as registered by the Population Census 2000 Source: Pirgop 2008, Statistics Estonia.
2) With this victory, the tsar claimed new lands, adding to his subjects the diverse animistic and Muslim population of Turkic Tatars and Chuvashes, and Finno-Ugric Maris, Mordvins, and Udmurts.
26) However, the vitae do not claim that Varsonofii could communicate with the local Maris, Mordvins, or Udmurts.
82) The local Mordvins promptly received a similar offer.
It was in this changing climate that the first financial incentives for conversion became law, even if they affected only elite Tatars and the Mordvins.
Wayne Dowler's book examines the late imperial debate about Russification as it centered on the problem of primary education for non-Russian easterners, in particular the Mar, Mordvins, Chuvash, Udmurts, Tatars, Bashkirs, Kalmyks, and K azakhs of the Kazan school district, one of the largest and most ethnically diverse of the Russian "East.