Morgan


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Mor·gan

 (môr′gən)
n.
A horse of a breed developed in the United States and noted for strength, endurance, and versatility.

[After Justin Morgan (1747-1798), American schoolteacher who owned the stallion, Figure, that founded the breed.]

Morgan

(ˈmɔːɡən)
n
(Breeds) an American breed of small compact saddle horse
[C19: named after Justin Morgan (1747–98), American owner of the original sire]

Morgan

(ˈmɔːɡən)
n
1. (Biography) Edwin (George). (1920–2010), Scottish poet, noted esp for his collection The Second Life (1968) and his many concrete and visual poems; appointed Scottish national poet 2004
2. (Biography) Sir Henry. 1635–88, Welsh buccaneer, who raided Spanish colonies in the West Indies for the English
3. (Biography) John Pierpont. 1837–1913, US financier, philanthropist, and art collector
4. (Biography) (Hywel) Rhodri (ˈrɒdrɪ). born 1939, Welsh Labour politician; first minister of Wales (2000–09)
5. (Biography) Thomas Hunt. 1866–1945, US biologist. He formulated the chromosome theory of heredity. Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1933

Mor•gan

(ˈmɔr gən)

n.
any of a breed of light carriage and saddle horses descended from the stallion Justin Morgan.
[1865–70, Amer.; after the original sire, owned by J. Morgan (1747–98)]

Mor•gan

(ˈmɔr gən)

n.
1. Daniel, 1736–1802, American Revolutionary general.
2. Sir Henry, 1635?–88, Welsh buccaneer in the Americas.
3. John Hunt, 1826–64, Confederate general.
4. J(ohn) P(ierpont), 1837–1913, U.S. financier and philanthropist.
5. his son John Pierpont, 1867–1943, U.S. financier.
6. Lewis Henry, 1818–81, U.S. ethnologist and anthropologist.
7. Thomas Hunt, 1866–1945, U.S. zoologist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Morgan - United States anthropologist who studied the Seneca (1818-1881)Morgan - United States anthropologist who studied the Seneca (1818-1881)
2.Morgan - United States biologist who formulated the chromosome theory of heredity (1866-1945)Morgan - United States biologist who formulated the chromosome theory of heredity (1866-1945)
3.Morgan - a Welsh buccaneer who raided Spanish colonies in the West Indies for the English (1635-1688)Morgan - a Welsh buccaneer who raided Spanish colonies in the West Indies for the English (1635-1688)
4.Morgan - soldier in the American Revolution who defeated the British in the battle of Cowpens, South Carolina (1736-1802)Morgan - soldier in the American Revolution who defeated the British in the battle of Cowpens, South Carolina (1736-1802)
5.Morgan - United States financier and philanthropist (1837-1913)Morgan - United States financier and philanthropist (1837-1913)
6.Morgan - an American breed of small compact saddle horses
mount, riding horse, saddle horse - a lightweight horse kept for riding only
Translations
morganMorgane
Morgan
References in classic literature ?
Now, Morgan," said Long John very sternly, "you never clapped your eyes on that Black--Black Dog before, did you, now?
We was a-talkin' of keel-hauling," answered Morgan.
The old Morgan place up at the Glen is for sale," said Gilbert, apropos of nothing in especial.
If we don't buy the Morgan place someone else will--and there is no other house in the Glen we would care to have, and no other really good site on which to build.
Some years afterward I met in Sacramento a man named Morgan, to whom I had a note of introduction from a friend in San Francisco.
It was composed of four members of great technical knowledge, Barbicane (with a casting vote in case of equality), General Morgan, Major Elphinstone, and J.
This missionary knight's name was La Cote Male Taile, and he said that this castle was the abode of Morgan le Fay, sister of King Arthur, and wife of King Uriens.
The elder one, Morgan, was a huge man, bronzed and moustached, with a deep bass voice and an almost guttural speech, and the other, Raff, was slight and effeminate, with nervous hands and watery, washed-out gray eyes, who spoke with a faint indefinable accent that was hauntingly reminiscent of the Cockney, and that was yet not Cockney of any brand she had ever encountered.
And so they parted; each persuaded that the other had less life in him than himself; and both greatly consoled and comforted by the little fiction they had agreed upon, respecting Becky Morgan, whose decease was no longer a precedent of uncomfortable application, and would be no business of theirs for half a score of years to come.
Leonard Kimball, of Spencervale, and Morgan Bell, of Carmody, were glaring at each other across the parlor.
Want Europe,' if he's Napoleon; 'want wives,' if he's Bluebeard; 'want Botticelli,' if he's Pierpont Morgan.
Professor Lloyd Morgan gives the following definition of "instinctive behaviour":