Morgan


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Mor·gan

 (môr′gən)
n.
A horse of a breed developed in the United States and noted for strength, endurance, and versatility.

[After Justin Morgan (1747-1798), American schoolteacher who owned the stallion, Figure, that founded the breed.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Morgan

(ˈmɔːɡən)
n
(Breeds) an American breed of small compact saddle horse
[C19: named after Justin Morgan (1747–98), American owner of the original sire]

Morgan

(ˈmɔːɡən)
n
1. (Biography) Edwin (George). (1920–2010), Scottish poet, noted esp for his collection The Second Life (1968) and his many concrete and visual poems; appointed Scottish national poet 2004
2. (Biography) Sir Henry. 1635–88, Welsh buccaneer, who raided Spanish colonies in the West Indies for the English
3. (Biography) John Pierpont. 1837–1913, US financier, philanthropist, and art collector
4. (Biography) (Hywel) Rhodri (ˈrɒdrɪ). born 1939, Welsh Labour politician; first minister of Wales (2000–09)
5. (Biography) Thomas Hunt. 1866–1945, US biologist. He formulated the chromosome theory of heredity. Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1933
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Mor•gan

(ˈmɔr gən)

n.
any of a breed of light carriage and saddle horses descended from the stallion Justin Morgan.
[1865–70, Amer.; after the original sire, owned by J. Morgan (1747–98)]

Mor•gan

(ˈmɔr gən)

n.
1. Daniel, 1736–1802, American Revolutionary general.
2. Sir Henry, 1635?–88, Welsh buccaneer in the Americas.
3. John Hunt, 1826–64, Confederate general.
4. J(ohn) P(ierpont), 1837–1913, U.S. financier and philanthropist.
5. his son John Pierpont, 1867–1943, U.S. financier.
6. Lewis Henry, 1818–81, U.S. ethnologist and anthropologist.
7. Thomas Hunt, 1866–1945, U.S. zoologist.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Morgan - United States anthropologist who studied the Seneca (1818-1881)Morgan - United States anthropologist who studied the Seneca (1818-1881)
2.Morgan - United States biologist who formulated the chromosome theory of heredity (1866-1945)Morgan - United States biologist who formulated the chromosome theory of heredity (1866-1945)
3.Morgan - a Welsh buccaneer who raided Spanish colonies in the West Indies for the English (1635-1688)Morgan - a Welsh buccaneer who raided Spanish colonies in the West Indies for the English (1635-1688)
4.Morgan - soldier in the American Revolution who defeated the British in the battle of Cowpens, South Carolina (1736-1802)Morgan - soldier in the American Revolution who defeated the British in the battle of Cowpens, South Carolina (1736-1802)
5.Morgan - United States financier and philanthropist (1837-1913)Morgan - United States financier and philanthropist (1837-1913)
6.Morgan - an American breed of small compact saddle horses
mount, riding horse, saddle horse - a lightweight horse kept for riding only
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
morganMorgane
Morgan
References in classic literature ?
Was that you drinking with him, Morgan? Step up here."
"Now, Morgan," said Long John very sternly, "you never clapped your eyes on that Black--Black Dog before, did you, now?"
"The old Morgan place up at the Glen is for sale," said Gilbert, apropos of nothing in especial.
Some years afterward I met in Sacramento a man named Morgan, to whom I had a note of introduction from a friend in San Francisco.
It was composed of four members of great technical knowledge, Barbicane (with a casting vote in case of equality), General Morgan, Major Elphinstone, and J.
This missionary knight's name was La Cote Male Taile, and he said that this castle was the abode of Morgan le Fay, sister of King Arthur, and wife of King Uriens.
The elder one, Morgan, was a huge man, bronzed and moustached, with a deep bass voice and an almost guttural speech, and the other, Raff, was slight and effeminate, with nervous hands and watery, washed-out gray eyes, who spoke with a faint indefinable accent that was hauntingly reminiscent of the Cockney, and that was yet not Cockney of any brand she had ever encountered.
It was plain that Becky Morgan's age still troubled him; though why, the child could scarcely understand.
We looked so much alike that people noticed it when we went out; so we shook the streets that Morgan's cab drives down, and took to climbing the piles of last December's snow on the streets where cheap people live.
Leonard Kimball, of Spencervale, and Morgan Bell, of Carmody, were glaring at each other across the parlor.
He only says 'want.' 'Want Europe,' if he's Napoleon; 'want wives,' if he's Bluebeard; 'want Botticelli,' if he's Pierpont Morgan. Never the 'I'; and if you could pierce through him, you'd find panic and emptiness in the middle."
Professor Lloyd Morgan gives the following definition of "instinctive behaviour":