Morisco


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Mo·ris·co

 (mə-rĭs′kō)
n. pl. Mo·ris·cos or Mo·ris·coes
A Spanish Moor who converted to Christianity after the Reconquista.

[Spanish, from Moro, Moor, from Latin Maurus; see Moor.]

Mo·ris′co adj.

Morisco

(məˈrɪskəʊ) or

Moresco

n, pl -cos or -coes
1. (Peoples) a Spanish Moor
2. (Dancing) a morris dance
adj
(Architecture) another word for Moorish
[C16: from Spanish, from Moro Moor]

Mo•ris•co

(məˈrɪs koʊ)

n., pl. -cos, -coes.
a member of the Muslim communities of Spain that continued to practice Islam secretly after its proscription.
[1540–50; < Sp, =mor(o) Moor + -isco adj. suffix]
References in classic literature ?
One day, as I was in the Alcana of Toledo, a boy came up to sell some pamphlets and old papers to a silk mercer, and, as I am fond of reading even the very scraps of paper in the streets, led by this natural bent of mine I took up one of the pamphlets the boy had for sale, and saw that it was in characters which I recognised as Arabic, and as I was unable to read them though I could recognise them, I looked about to see if there were any Spanish-speaking Morisco at hand to read them for me; nor was there any great difficulty in finding such an interpreter, for even had I sought one for an older and better language I should have found him.
I withdrew at once with the Morisco into the cloister of the cathedral, and begged him to turn all these pamphlets that related to Don Quixote into the Castilian tongue, without omitting or adding anything to them, offering him whatever payment he pleased.
Enrique Gonzalez Martinez, donde se encuentra la puerta principal del Museo del Chopo; luego, por Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, al girar noventa grados a la izquierda; y despues, tomo Santa Maria la Ribera con otra vuelta de los mismos grados a la derecha para finalizar dentro del Kiosko Morisco.
Para el morisco todas estas dimensiones estan presentes en su lengua y en su comportamiento, como veremos.
536/1141) on a Jewish silk merchant in Gafsa, comparing diaspora discourses among Morisco descendants and Sephardim today, and remembering the Jewish past through song in contemporary Tunisia.
By 1614 every last Morisco was gone, and Islam disappeared from the Iberian Peninsula.
It certainly responds to the vogue for morisco themes in the first and second decades of the seventeenth century; in fact, one of its moras borrows the name and religious trajectory of a character from Guzman de Alfarache, Daraja.
The suffering of the Jewish, Moors, Conversos, and Morisco people and the other victims of the Inquisition are described in detail; however, there is little emotion in the descriptions of this harrowing event.
Por otro lado y en el Quijote, Cervantes presenta a un morisco "cordial, [.
One day, as I was in the Alcana of Toledo, a boy came up to sell some pamphlets and old papers to a silk mercer, and, as I am fond of reading even the very scraps of paper in the streets, led by this natural bent of mine I took up one of the pamphlets the boy had for sale, and saw that it was in characters which I recognised as Arabic, and as I was unable to read them though I could recognise them, I looked about to see if there were any Spanish-speaking Morisco at hand to read them for me; nor was there any great difficulty in finding such an interpreter, for even had I sought one for an older and better language I should have found him.
Y la casa de Avenida Juarez, construida por el arquitecto Antonio Rivas Mercado, testigo de la larga epopeya de la edificacion del Palacio de Bellas Artes; de la despedida nostalgica del Kiosko Morisco y la llegada del Hemiciclo a Benito Juarez, ostenta aun el escudo familiar en su portada.
Al-Annuri was a Morisco by birth, a paler-skinned Moor (his anonymous but magnificently realized portrait now graces the collections of the University of Birmingham); he left London a matter of weeks before Shakespeare began writing Othello.