Mormonism

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Mor·mon

 (môr′mən) Mormon Church
n.
1. An ancient prophet believed to have compiled a sacred history of the Americas, which was translated and published by Joseph Smith as the Book of Mormon in 1830.
2. A member of the Mormon Church. Also called Latter-day Saint.
adj.
Of or relating to the Mormons, their religion, or the Mormon Church.

Mor′mon·ism n.

Mormonism

1. the doctrines and polity of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, founded in the U.S. in 1830 by Joseph Smith, especially its adoption of the Book of Mormon as an adjunct to the Bible.
2. adherence to these doctrines or membership in the Mormon Church. Also Mormondom. — Mormon, n., adj.
See also: Protestantism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mormonism - the doctrines and practices of the Mormon Church based on the Book of Mormon
Protestantism - the theological system of any of the churches of western Christendom that separated from the Roman Catholic Church during the Reformation
Translations

Mormonism

[ˈmɔːmənɪzəm] Nmormonismo m

Mormonism

nMormonentum nt
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References in periodicals archive ?
McConkie came home and started integrating pieces of his upbringing into his life, blending his Buddhist practice with aspects of Mormon theology. His favorite Mormon ideas--that humans develop eternally into more complete versions of themselves, for example--complement his professional work in adult development.
In Mormon theology the Lord tells his followers that "the worth of souls is great" in His sight (Doctrine and Covenants 18:10).
One reason for these converts' commendation of dancing stems from the belief in Mormon theology that an essential purpose of the human experience is to receive a body.
Mason is much better with his insights into people and power dynamics than he is with his explanations of Mormon theology, but then again so was Brigham Young.
According to Mormon theology, Joseph Smith, a farmer living in New York, received a visit from God and Jesus Christ in the early 1820s, instructing him that, "he should ...
Reading these, as well as the accompanying critique of Mormon theology, is necessary for realizing the full, thought-provoking potential of this slender book.
Although Young may have been a violent racist, Turner places these beliefs in a particular historical moment and within the context of Mormon theology. His book will stand as the definitive biography of Brigham Young for years to come.
In our list of books, we've removed some of the nuances of this distinction; for example, we've included some works inspired by other books in the Jewish canon and a few others drawn from Mormon theology; some are Jewish in focus, while others are Christian.
Where I think the analogy, between connecting Judaism to politics and Mormonism to politics, breaks down somewhat is that Mormon theology (as I very primitively understand it) has certain inherently political things to say beyond the sort of Leviticus-style moral prescriptions you can find in any organized religion: about the role of voluntarism in society; about American exceptionalism.
(Indeed, Mormon theology treats it as Godgiven.) We might look to the 50 state constitutions, most of which are considerably easier to amend.
Despite the fact that the villagers continue to resist conversion, Price affirms his faith, belting out the anthem "I Believe" The number highlights various Mormon tenets, including the ideas that ancient Jews sailed to America, that Jesus preached there, and that in 1978 "God changed his mind about black people" Price's partner, Cunningham, has less of a grasp on Mormon theology. We learn that he has never actually read The Book of Mormon ("too boring").
(85) Even William Waters, who was a friend of Newman's, wrote about his time in Utah upon Newman's request and dedicated his resulting book to Newman, addressed Mormon theology briefly while stressing Brigham Young's despotism and the "practical" problems with polygamy.