Moro Gulf


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Moro Gulf

An inlet of the Celebes Sea southwest of Mindanao, Philippines.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sultan Kudarat town administrator Banjo Mampon said the remains of Pudi Guiadel were recovered at past noon near the mouth of the Rio Grande, the largest river in Mindanao, leading to the Moro Gulf.
Farmers cultivate seaweed in the vast expanse of Moro Gulf, Davao Gulf and Sulu Sea, while rubber is produced in North Cotabato, Basilan and Zamboanga Sibugay.
The islands in the Moro Gulf belong to two city villages, Panubigan and Dita, and only four are officially declared tourism zones by the city government-Sirommon, Bisaya-Bisaya, Buh-Buh and Baung-Baung.
Senator Legarda noted three incidents: the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004, which caused the highest number of fatalities with an estimated 227,000 deaths in 14 countries; the Sulawesi tsunami just this September that claimed over 2,000 lives in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia; and the Moro Gulf tsunami in 1976, which registered 4,381 deaths, the highest number of tsunami-related fatalities in the Philippines.
Coyme said Commodore Elson Hermogino, PCG chief, wanted BRP Bagacay sent to the southern Philippines "because the most troubled area in the Philippines is here in Western Mindanao." The Coast Guard said it is keeping an eye on three critical sea lanes: the Sibutu Passage, Basilan Strait, and the Moro Gulf.
Senator Loren Legarda, chairwoman of the Senate climate change committee, today urged various government agencies to deal with rampant illegal poaching in the high seas, especially within the Moro Gulf and the Sulu Sea.
The latest official count puts Haiyan nearly on par with a 1976 tsunami in the southern Philippines, generated by a major undersea earthquake in the Moro Gulf, that left between 5,000 and 8,000 people dead.
The previous deadliest disaster in the Philippines occurred in 1976, when a tsunami triggered by a magnitude 7.9 earthquake devastated the Moro Gulf on the southern island of Mindanao, killing between 5,000 and 8,000 people.
Until Haiyan, the deadliest disaster was in 1976, when a tsunami triggered by a magnitude 7.9 earthquake devastated the Moro Gulf on the southern Philippine island of Mindanao, killing between 5,000 and 8,000 people.
A 7.9 magnitude earthquake triggered a tsunami that killed 6,000 people in the Moro Gulf, southern Philippines in 1976.
Among the most destructive events were the 1923 Kanto, the 1948 Fukui and the 1995 Kobe (Japan) earthquakes (99,000, 5,100, and 6,400 casualties, respectively), the 1935 and the 1999 Chi-Chi (Taiwan) earthquakes (3,300 and 2,500 casualties, respectively), and the 1976 M7.6 Moro Gulf and 1990 M7.6 Luzon (Philippines) earthquakes (7,100 and 2,400 casualties, respectively).