morpheme

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mor·pheme

 (môr′fēm′)
n.
A meaningful linguistic unit that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts. The word man and the suffix -ed (as in walked) are morphemes.

[French morphème, blend of Greek morphē, form and French phonème, phoneme; see phoneme.]

mor·phem′ic adj.
mor·phem′i·cal·ly adv.

morpheme

(ˈmɔːfiːm)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics a speech element having a meaning or grammatical function that cannot be subdivided into further such elements
[C20: from French, from Greek morphē form, coined on the model of phoneme; see -eme]
morˈphemic adj
morˈphemically adv

mor•pheme

(ˈmɔr fim)

n.
any of the minimal grammatical units of a language, each constituting a word or meaningful part of a word that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts, as the, write, or the -ed of waited. Compare allomorph (def. 2).
[1895–1900; < French morphème; see morph-, -eme]
mor•phe′mic, adj.
mor•phe′mi•cal•ly, adv.

morpheme

A word or part of a word that cannot be further divided into smaller elements.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.morpheme - minimal meaningful language unit; it cannot be divided into smaller meaningful units
language unit, linguistic unit - one of the natural units into which linguistic messages can be analyzed
allomorph - a variant phonological representation of a morpheme; "the final sounds of `bets' and `beds' and `horses' and `oxen' are allomorphs of the English plural morpheme"
free form, free morpheme - a morpheme that can occur alone
bound form, bound morpheme - a morpheme that occurs only as part of a larger construction; eg an -s at the end of plural nouns
classifier - a word or morpheme used in some languages in certain contexts (such as counting) to indicate the semantic class to which the counted item belongs
ending, termination - the end of a word (a suffix or inflectional ending or final morpheme); "I don't like words that have -ism as an ending"
Translations
морфема
morfém
morfeemi
morfem
morféma
morfemaморфема
morfem
морфема

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] Nmorfema m

morpheme

nMorphem nt

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] nmorfema m
References in periodicals archive ?
2009) that morphological awareness is an important variable in determining the overall writing performance (not just in the writing of specific morphemes explicitly taught to students).
In closing, when all these infant to eighth grade students demonstrate reading comprehension of phonemes, morphemes, phrases, and syntax-then we all have progressed via the effective application of the aforementioned strategies.
It would then remain to be explained why two morphemes with the same meaning co-occur: vari and gib.
Unlike previous approaches, such as Quirk and Wrenn's (1994), evidence is gathered to hold that a process of grammaticalization has taken place that motivates the insertion of -bora into the inventory of derivational morphemes.
In English, for example, long consonants are not allowed within single morphemes, units of meaning, but they are permitted in compound words like bookcase, where two identical consonants are located next to each other across the boundary between the two morphemes.
These clitics should either be treated as the same morpheme (as suggested by the gloss), with an account of their distribution, or treated as two distinct morphemes with overlapping meaning, but distinguished in the gloss.
Also outlawed are reversible compounds, such as BIRDSONG SONGBIRD, BOOKCASE CASEBOOK, GUNSHOT SHOTGUN, HORSERACE RACEHORSE, and even JAYVEE VEEJAY and TOKYO KYOTO (a reversal of two morphemes that mean "capital city").
Originally, <-ban> is derived from the morphemes <-a-n> in an affixal string.
Morphology which deals with words and their formation from smaller meaningful components called morphemes.
As classical roots and word-forming morphemes are frequently used in the process of term formation, acquisition of the terminological meaning by a common word occurs and new terms are formed on the basis of existing ones, it has become possible to distinguish terms with motivation being based on associative links of terminological meaning with lexico-semantic variant of a Latin root (e.
Informed literacy instruction requires teachers to have thorough knowledge of literacy-related content, which includes phonemes, syllables, and morphemes.
This study focuses on the limits between the morphological phenomena of inflection and derivation or, more specifically, on the ways in which these processes overlap in Old English nouns which contain the suffixal morphemes -a, -e, -o and -u.