morpheme

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mor·pheme

 (môr′fēm′)
n.
A meaningful linguistic unit that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts. The word man and the suffix -ed (as in walked) are morphemes.

[French morphème, blend of Greek morphē, form and French phonème, phoneme; see phoneme.]

mor·phem′ic adj.
mor·phem′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

morpheme

(ˈmɔːfiːm)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics a speech element having a meaning or grammatical function that cannot be subdivided into further such elements
[C20: from French, from Greek morphē form, coined on the model of phoneme; see -eme]
morˈphemic adj
morˈphemically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mor•pheme

(ˈmɔr fim)

n.
any of the minimal grammatical units of a language, each constituting a word or meaningful part of a word that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts, as the, write, or the -ed of waited. Compare allomorph (def. 2).
[1895–1900; < French morphème; see morph-, -eme]
mor•phe′mic, adj.
mor•phe′mi•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

morpheme

A word or part of a word that cannot be further divided into smaller elements.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.morpheme - minimal meaningful language unit; it cannot be divided into smaller meaningful units
language unit, linguistic unit - one of the natural units into which linguistic messages can be analyzed
allomorph - a variant phonological representation of a morpheme; "the final sounds of `bets' and `beds' and `horses' and `oxen' are allomorphs of the English plural morpheme"
free form, free morpheme - a morpheme that can occur alone
bound form, bound morpheme - a morpheme that occurs only as part of a larger construction; eg an -s at the end of plural nouns
classifier - a word or morpheme used in some languages in certain contexts (such as counting) to indicate the semantic class to which the counted item belongs
ending, termination - the end of a word (a suffix or inflectional ending or final morpheme); "I don't like words that have -ism as an ending"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
морфема
morfém
morfeemi
morfem
morféma
morfemaморфема
morfem
морфема

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] Nmorfema m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

morpheme

nMorphem nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] nmorfema m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
"Luo is the language of light in which the Holy Bible was written and is therefore the key to deciphering meanings of identities, expressions and contexts of all other faiths universally since all primarily constructed on Luo morphemes," he says.
Caught in the spell of words: Stories are made of words and words are made of morphemes. Retrieved from https:// caughtinthespellofwords.wordpress.com/
Although the formation of deverbal nouns with a dental suffix is identified by Pilch as conveying i-mutation (m[??]g[??] "ambition" < magan "to be able"), the vast majority of derivational processes presenting i-mutation can be included under the general heading of zero derivation (or derivation without derivational morphemes).
Especially, deciding the status of a number of morphemes as being prefixes or roots proved to be difficult.
In the 10 lectures, she discusses spatial semantics in languages and language learners, mechanisms of semantic category construction in first language acquisition, the crosslinguistic categorization of everyday events, grammatical morphemes, noun semantics and natural ontology in language acquisition, verb learning and argument structure, language typology and "thinking for speaking," learning about end-state entailment in German vs.
The system first pre-processed the characters of Turkish alphabet and then it only used nouns, which were stripped from their inflectional morphemes. Then these nouns were clustered via k-means algorithm and concepts were assigned to this cluster of words using a user interface.
Also missing from this work, but present in the Hurrian grammars, is a short index of morphemes (derivational and grammatical), which would be very useful.
However, lexicons for East Asian languages such as Korean, Chinese, and Japanese are often composed of frequently used morphemes. Morphemes have been used as the smallest linguistic unit of a word in previous works [8-9].
Communication is meaning-dependent, and these meanings depend on the make-up of words which are the morphemes which in turn are environment dependent.
The first aspect is the use of negative auxiliaries in Mari, a technique which can be described briefly by saying that negative bases are suffixed with morphemes of grammatical person, tense and mood.
Next I briefly describe the syllable patterns attested in bound morphemes. Finally, I look at the distribution patterns of the individual consonant phonemes in terms of word-position and adjacency in consonant clusters, and from this derive phonotactic generalizations about the language.