morpheme

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mor·pheme

 (môr′fēm′)
n.
A meaningful linguistic unit that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts. The word man and the suffix -ed (as in walked) are morphemes.

[French morphème, blend of Greek morphē, form and French phonème, phoneme; see phoneme.]

mor·phem′ic adj.
mor·phem′i·cal·ly adv.

morpheme

(ˈmɔːfiːm)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics a speech element having a meaning or grammatical function that cannot be subdivided into further such elements
[C20: from French, from Greek morphē form, coined on the model of phoneme; see -eme]
morˈphemic adj
morˈphemically adv

mor•pheme

(ˈmɔr fim)

n.
any of the minimal grammatical units of a language, each constituting a word or meaningful part of a word that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts, as the, write, or the -ed of waited. Compare allomorph (def. 2).
[1895–1900; < French morphème; see morph-, -eme]
mor•phe′mic, adj.
mor•phe′mi•cal•ly, adv.

morpheme

A word or part of a word that cannot be further divided into smaller elements.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.morpheme - minimal meaningful language unit; it cannot be divided into smaller meaningful units
language unit, linguistic unit - one of the natural units into which linguistic messages can be analyzed
allomorph - a variant phonological representation of a morpheme; "the final sounds of `bets' and `beds' and `horses' and `oxen' are allomorphs of the English plural morpheme"
free form, free morpheme - a morpheme that can occur alone
bound form, bound morpheme - a morpheme that occurs only as part of a larger construction; eg an -s at the end of plural nouns
classifier - a word or morpheme used in some languages in certain contexts (such as counting) to indicate the semantic class to which the counted item belongs
ending, termination - the end of a word (a suffix or inflectional ending or final morpheme); "I don't like words that have -ism as an ending"
Translations
морфема
morfém
morfeemi
morfem
morféma
morfemaморфема
morfem
морфема

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] Nmorfema m

morpheme

nMorphem nt

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] nmorfema m
References in periodicals archive ?
They consider what syntactic labels do, within the syntax and morphology, and for semantics and phonology; the content of a label and whether it is drawn from one or both parts of a complex object; how generally predictable labels are; whether they are components of a structure or determined by a labeling procedure or outsourced from the syntax; whether lexical roots have morpho-syntactic features that serve as their labels or whether their syntactic/morphological categories are provided by formal elements with which they combine; and how labeling might be involved in more diverse syntactic phenomena like agreement, case, and movement.
In the light of his categorization, the phenomenon is classified into tautology (i.e., one constituent is synonymous with the other), stylistic pleonasm (i.e., pragmatically motivated), and hypercharacterization (i.e., grammatically motivated), regardless of whether it responds to semantic or morpho-syntactic motivations (2005: 119).
This structure gives the genitive a morpho-syntactic status between noun and adjective.
After the pre-processing of the corpus, the sentences are treated by a morpho-syntactic analyzer to extract the terms.
This asymmetry can be analyzed as follows: final and penultimate stress shift in imperative phrases is part of the indigenous grammar of the dialect, but this stress pattern is constrained by morpho-syntactic considerations, such as the number and form of enclitics.
Section 2 introduces a preliminary study about the Bengali MWEs and their morpho-syntactic based classification.
Linguistic features investigated include future markers in Sranan, relative clauses in Standard Jamaican English, negation in Bequia, various morpho-syntactic features representing Jamaican creolisms, the Tobagonian repertoire, and Eastern Maroon lectal variation in French Guiana.
Basic processes underlying reading comprehension are complex and call on the oral language system and a conscious understanding of this system, i.e., metalinguistic awareness, at all levels from semantic and morpho-syntactic to pragmatic awareness.
While the morpho-syntactic characteristics of these languages are remarkably different due to typological factors (case marking vs.