morphosyntax

(redirected from Morphosyntactic)
Related to Morphosyntactic: morphosyntax

mor·pho·syn·tax

 (môr′fō-sĭn′tăks′)
n.
1. The study of grammatical categories or linguistic units that have both morphological and syntactic properties.
2. The set of rules that govern linguistic units whose properties are definable by both morphological and syntactic criteria.

morphosyntax

(ˌmɔːfəʊˈsɪntæks)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics the study of the interaction of morphology and syntax
Translations

morphosyntax

[ˌmɔːfəʊˈsɪntæks] Nmorfosintaxis f inv
References in periodicals archive ?
The present paper aims to shed more light on the morphosyntactic properties of Chibchan verbal person marking, both from a diachronic and a synchronic perspective.
The morphosyntactic descriptions (MSDs) that the words of the corpus are annotated with follow the JOS MSD specifications.
Chapter 5 compares a short list of general characteristics of English-based Caribbean creoles--mostly morphosyntactic (e.g., frequent use of topicalizers, serialization, copular constructions, and TMA system)--to similar linguistic features in North Arawakan languages.
Example (5) illustrates how, after providing a morphosyntactic recast, the teacher does not offer the learner the opportunity to self-repair but, rather, goes on with the lesson.
His grammar covers sound system and orthography, words and their categories, organization of the verb, theme categories and other verb classes, simple and complex sentences, movement and other syntactic rules, negation, questions, and reference to third person and morphosyntactic problems.
It is worth mentioning here that the ensemble of formulaic sequences, regardless of their morphosyntactic variations, account for a large part of normal language use.
Another pair of chapters deals with persistence and innovation: "Morphosyntactic Persistence" (chapter seven, by Giampaolo Salvi) in grammatical categories and constructions, and "Syntactic and Morphosyntactic Typology and Change" (chapter eight, by Adam Ledgeway) in the nominal group, the verbal group, and the sentence.
The paper presents the results of three empirical studies, which confirm that the complexity of grammatical environment is instrumental in the choice between elective morphosyntactic constructions.
The characterization offered in Section 2 establishes a comprehensive portrait of all the aspects associated with linguistic categorization: morphosyntactic constructions that constitute the backbone of any classificatory system, distributional features of the scheme, and semantic properties.
On the other hand, a lexicon-based annotation of all elements, irrespective of whether they are bound or free morphemes, enables us to, at a later stage, implement an effective morphosyntactic analysis in one step.