mortality table

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mortality table

n
(Insurance) insurance an actuarial table indicating life expectancy and death frequency for a given age, occupation, etc
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Noun1.mortality table - an actuarial table indicating life expectancy and probability of death as a function or age and sex and occupation etc
actuarial table, statistical table - a table of statistical data
References in periodicals archive ?
In October 2014, the Society released the RP-2014 base mortality tables and MP-2014 improvement scale, the first update to the SOA's pension plan mortality tables in more than a decade.
The economic environment over the last decade along with new mortality tables and rising PBGC premiums have put into focus just how out of control pension plan costs can get.
The only way to take advantage of that mortality savings is with a new policy issued on the updated mortality tables.
You may be asked the owner to proceed with the certification or mortality tables relative to the population of the regime and their follow-up, if any.
Last October, the Society of Actuaries (SOA) Retirement Plans Experience Committee (RPEC) released the final report of the RP-2014 mortality tables.
Private-sector plans are already required to use new mortality tables that account for increased longevity when formulating cost estimates.
TurkStat used life tables, also known as mortality tables, to gather their data, which show what the probability is that a person of that age will die before his or her next birthday.
Insurance companies rely on base mortality tables when pricing annuities, using the historic experience of their insureds and/or industry tables developed by the Society of Actuaries.
Using regional mortality tables from the Office for National Statistics, Pensions Minister Steve Webb calculates that I'll live to the age of 83 because I reside in Yorkshire.
In addition, effective January 1, 2014, Aegon will establish its longevity reserves in the Netherlands on prospective mortality tables instead of observed mortality tables.
First we study how VILDAs influence households' optimal consumption patterns as well as portfolio allocations across stocks, bonds, and VILDAs in a world with idiosyncratic but not systematic longevity risk, that is, unknown individual lifetimes but nonstochastic mortality tables.
Another factor that shook up the industry in 2008 was the sudden change in mortality tables used by two of the major life expectancy companies, which increased life expectancies by some 25 to 30 percent.