Moss jelly

Moss jelly

A jelly made from moss. The jelly had little nutritional value, but was still considered good for the sick. Depending on the kind of moss (e.g., Iceland moss), the procedure for making the jelly varied somewhat, but generally about an ounce of dried moss was boiled in a quart of water and, after a substantial amount of water had boiled away, the remainder was strained through a sieve. Flavoring or a little milk was added if desired.
References in periodicals archive ?
While today's toddlers can enjoy appetising meals from children's food author Annabel Karmel, the stomach-churning nursery menu in post-war Britain included "fricassee of brains" and "Irish moss jelly".