vote of non-confidence

(redirected from Motion of non-confidence)

vote of non-confidence

n
(Parliamentary Procedure) parliament Also: motion of non-confidence Canadian a vote or motion in a legislative body censuring an aspect of or indicating a lack of majority support for a government policy. Also called (in Britain and certain other countries): vote of no confidence
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The constituents of the day (and present-day constitutionalists) could not conceive of an elected assembly ever adopting a motion of non-confidence vis-a-vis the Queen.
On 4 December 2008, the Governor General of Canada, Her Excellency the Right Honourable Michaelle Jean, granted a request from Prime Minister Stephen Harper for a prorogation of Parliament, just six weeks after a federal election, three weeks into the new session, and two sitting days before an opposition motion of non-confidence was likely to defeat the government and pave the way for a Liberal-led coalition government assuming power.
15, a motion of non-confidence, put forward by Chief Harold Turner (Mercredi's cousin), was overwhelmingly passed.
The government has 14 days to try to undo the motion of non-confidence by getting the House to adopt a second motion stating "That this House has confidence in Her Majesty's Government', and equally any other political party can try to get the support of the House for it forming a government and passing a similar motion.
* adopt the "constructive non confidence" procedure whereby the opposition can only bring down a government via an explicit motion of non-confidence that would also identify who would become the new Prime Minister.
On March 6, 2008, a motion of non-confidence in the Chair, Gary Goodyear, was adopted.
The cancellation of a May 8, 2007 meeting of the Standing Committee on Official Languages by Chair Guy Lauzon, led to the adoption, at a meeting held on May 15, 2007 pursuant to Standing Order 106.(4), of a motion of non-confidence in the Chair.
On May 30, the House considered a motion of non-confidence in the Speaker, Michael Malley which had been moved by the Opposition House Leader.
On April 26, the Opposition House Leader gave notice of his intention to move a motion of non-confidence in the Speaker.
On March 16, 2000, at the beginning of Routine Proceedings, Michel Gauthier (Roberval, BQ) rose on a point of order to ask that the House debate the motion of non-confidence in the Speaker moved by Gilles Duceppe (Laurier--Sainte-Marie, BQ).
In a break with traditional practices, Official Opposition Leader Gary Doer did not move a motion of non-confidence at the conclusion of his remarks on the budget.
Ashton rose on a matter of privilege and moved a motion of non-confidence in the Speaker.