Koh-i-noor

(redirected from Mountain of Light)
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Koh-i-noor

(ˌkəʊɪˈnʊə) ,

Kohinor

or

Kohinur

n
(Jewellery) a very large oval Indian diamond, part of the British crown jewels since 1849, weighing 108.8 carats
[C19: from Persian Kōh-i-nūr, literally: mountain of light, from kōh mountain + Arabic nūr light]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Strategic announced production from the Mountain of Light processing facility at Leigh Creek in South Australia had begun in mid-April, in the form of copper cement.
Koh-i-Noor, which is Persian for "mountain of light," was originally a Mughal-cut gem that weighed 191 carats, according to (https://www.britannica.com/topic/Koh-i-noor) Encyclopedia Britannica .
The Koh-i-Noor ('Mountain of Light') diamond, now a part of the British Crown Jewels, has witnessed the birth and the fall of empires across the Indian subcontinent.
The Koh-i-Noor ('Mountain of Light'), now part of the British Crown Jewels, has witnessed the birth and the fall of empires across the Indian subcontinent.
The Koh-i-Noor ("Mountain of Light") diamond, now a part of the British Crown Jewels, has witnessed the birth and the fall of empires across the Indian subcontinent.
The Cave of Hira, which lies just a few miles away outside Makkah is a sacred place that remains amongst those religious sites still preserved by many of the Muslims and where the Last Messenger (PBUH) of Allah the Almighty, was revealed the first verses of the Quran when he was inside this cave, which is located near the top of a steep hill called Jabl-i-Noor (mountain of light).
WHAT diamond is named after the Persian for "mountain of light"?
On 29 March 1849, the ten-year-old maharaja of Punjab was compelled to hand over great riches to the British, including perhaps the single most valuable object on the subcontinent--the celebrated Koh-i-Noor diamond, aptly called the Mountain of Light. The history of the Koh-i-Noor that was then commissioned by the British may have been one woven together from gossip of Delhi bazaars, but it was to be become the accepted version.
Kohinoor, which means 'Mountain of Light', is in no way a purveyor of light but was deeply mired in centuries of torture, murder, mutilation, bloodshed and calamity for its bearers and owners.
The first stop on the itinerary was Mecca, where the children visited Al Masjid al-Haram (the Holy Mosque), Mina Valley, Hira and Thawr caves, Muzdalifah, Jabal al-Noor (Mountain of Light), and Mount Arafat.
The first stop on the itinerary was Mecca, where the orphans visited Mina Valley, Jamarat, Hira and Thawr caves, Muzdalifah, Jabal al-Noor (Mountain of Light), and Mount Arafat.
It was Nadir Shah, or so legend has it, who baptised the diamond the Kohinoor, or "Mountain of Light." One of his consorts memorably and colorfully stated, "If a strong man were to throw four stones -- one north, one south, one east, one west -- and a fifth stone up into the air, and if the space between them were to be filled with gold, it would not equal the value of the Kohinoor."