move on

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move

 (mo͞ov)
v. moved, mov·ing, moves
v.intr.
1.
a. To change in position from one point to another: moved away from the window.
b. To follow a specified course: Earth moves around the sun.
c. To change posture or position; stir: too scared to move.
d. To start off; depart: After waiting for an hour, we decided it was time to move.
e. Games To change position on a board in a board game.
f. To go from one residence or location to another; relocate: We moved to a new apartment.
g. Linguistics To be copied or moved by means of a movement transformation to a new position in syntactic structure.
2.
a. To progress in sequence; go forward: a novel that moves slowly.
b. To progress toward a particular state or condition: moving up in the company; move on to a new subject.
3. To be disposed of by sale: Woolens move slowly in the summer.
4. To be put in motion or to turn according to a prescribed motion. Used of machinery.
5.
a. To exhibit great activity or energy: Things were really moving backstage.
b. To initiate an action; act: It's time to make a decision and move.
c. To be active in a particular environment: moves in diplomatic circles.
6. To stir the emotions: words that have the power to move.
7. To make a formal motion in parliamentary procedure: move for an adjournment.
8. To evacuate. Used of the bowels.
v.tr.
1.
a. To change the place or position of: moved the chair into the corner; could not move his arm.
b. To cause to go from one place to another: moved the crowd away.
c. Games To change (a piece) from one position to another in a board game: moved a pawn.
2.
a. To change the course of: moved the discussion to other matters.
b. To cause to progress or advance: moved the research into new thinking.
3.
a. To dislodge from a fixed point of view, as by persuasion: "Speak to him, ladies, see if you can move him" (Shakespeare).
b. To prompt to action; rouse: Anger moved her to speak out.
c. To arouse the emotions of; affect or stir.
4.
a. To cause to function: This lever moves the elevator.
b. To cause to progress or advance: moved the project beyond conventional thinking.
5.
a. To propose or request in formal parliamentary procedure: moved that a vote be taken.
b. To make formal application to (a court, for example).
6. To dispose of by sale: moved the new merchandise quickly.
7. To cause (the bowels) to evacuate.
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of moving.
b. A particular manner of moving: made some intricate moves on the dance floor.
2. A change of residence or location.
3. Games
a. An act of transferring a piece from one position to another in board games.
b. The prescribed manner in which a piece may be played.
c. A participant's turn to make a play.
4. An action taken to achieve an objective; a maneuver: a move to halt the arms race.
Phrasal Verbs:
move in
To begin to occupy a residence or place of business.
move on
To shift one's attention or emotions to other matters, often as part of recovering from a setback or difficulty: After he was laid off, he moved on and started looking for another job.
Idioms:
get a move on Informal
To get started; get going.
move in on
1. To make intrusive advances toward; intrude on.
2. To attempt to seize control of: moving in on their territory.
on the move
1. Busily moving about; active: A nurse is on the move all day.
2. Going from one place to another: troops on the move.
3. Making progress; advancing: a technology that is clearly on the move.

[Middle English moven, from Old French movoir, from Latin movēre; see meuə- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: move, affect1, touch
These verbs mean to stir the emotions of a person or group. Move suggests a strong or deep emotional impact that is often expressed openly: a performer who moved the audience to laughter and tears; scenes of famine that moved us to pity. Affect can suggest a quieter but more persistent emotional state, as of grief, awe, or sorrow: "Roosevelt was deeply affected by his loss. One by one, the President's closest companions had fallen away" (Geoffrey C. Ward).
Touch implies a personal and often inspirational experience, as of sympathy, admiration, or tenderness: "Mr. Micawber pressed my hand, and groaned, and afterwards shed tears. I was greatly touched" (Charles Dickens).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

move on

vb (adverb)
1. to go or cause (someone) to leave somewhere
2. (intr) to progress; evolve: football has moved on since then.
3. (Psychology) (intr) to put a difficult experience behind one and progress mentally or emotionally
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.move on - move forward, also in the metaphorical sensemove on - move forward, also in the metaphorical sense; "Time marches on"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
forge - move ahead steadily; "He forged ahead"
penetrate - make one's way deeper into or through; "The hikers did not manage to penetrate the dense forest"
creep up, sneak up - advance stealthily or unnoticed; "Age creeps up on you"
encroach, impinge, infringe - advance beyond the usual limit
plough on, press on, push on - continue moving forward
string along, string - move or come along
overhaul, overtake, pass - travel past; "The sports car passed all the trucks"
close in, draw in - advance or converge on; "The police were closing in on him"
edge, inch - advance slowly, as if by inches; "He edged towards the car"
rachet up, ratchet, ratchet down - move by degrees in one direction only; "a ratcheting lopping tool"
elapse, glide by, go by, slide by, slip by, slip away, go along, pass, lapse - pass by; "three years elapsed"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.