Mozarabic


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Related to Mozarabic: Mozarabic architecture

Moz·ar·a·bic

 (mō-zăr′ə-bĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to the Mozarabs, their language, or their culture.
n.
Any of the early Romance dialects spoken in the parts of the Iberian Peninsula under Moorish power and heavily influenced by Arabic.

Moz•ar•a•bic

(moʊˈzær ə bɪk)

adj.
1. of or characteristic of the Mozarabs or their speech.
n.
2. any of the Romance dialects, descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Visigothic kingdom, spoken in the portions of the Iberian Peninsula under Moorish control.
[1700–10]
Translations

Mozarabic

[mɒzˈærəbɪk]
A. ADJmozárabe
B. Nmozárabe m
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for direction of execution and coordination of safety and health of the work project of construction of signaling and improvement of the road of the silver road or mozarabic road (2019/021)
Suffice it to recall, here, the opposite: how the term almadia, of Arab origin, disappeared with the passage of time being completely replaced, among other lexemes, by the indigenous canoe (canoa), despite the conceptual differences between the Mozarabic term and the indigenous one described accurately by the chroniclers.
Moreover, the beasts of the Apocalypse that populate some of the most famous illuminated Beatus manuscripts, such as the ones now held at the Escorial and the Biblioteca Nacional in Madrid, are informed by Mozarabic aesthetics and share some morphological features with the buraq of the Libro del alborayque.
It was probably completed in April 883 at the court of Oviedo by a Mozarabic cleric, perhaps identified as Dulcidius, a Toledan priest close to Alfonso III and sent by him on a mission to Cordoba in that same year.
In the Mozarabic style of the manuscript pages depicting the apocalypse that Schapiro discussed, Rothko found inspiration for a religious art that, while being abstract, was not simply outside or beyond the world.
Furthermore, it was observed that Magribi Arabic is from the Arabic dialects and was derived from different substrata and a mixture of many languages Berber, Latin (African Romance), old Arabic, Turkish, French, Spanish, Mozarabic, Italian, and Niger-Congo languages, integrating new English and French words.
Asimismo, los trabajos de Sebastian Brock o Susan Ashbrook Harvey sobre las comunidades cristianas orientales de Siria deberian servir como marco de referencia para examinar las relaciones entre diferentes comunidades religiosas y tambien para matizar apreciaciones como la que el profesor Fernandez-Morera hace de las comunidades cristianas y, donde, haciendose eco de autores como Norman Roth, escribe que "Mozarabic Christianity was generally heretical" (226).
Susan Boynton contributes an important study both on the crucial role played by Francisco Ximenez de Cisneros (1436?-1517), archbishop of Toledo from 1495 to 1517, in preserving the city's unique Mozarabic rite, and on the subsequent reception history of his work that became "an early modern symbol of the Spanish nation" (p.
The verb can be found in medieval Mozarabic hargas from the Iberian Peninsula.
THE LOSS OF SPAIN: THE TOPIC OF LAMENTATION AND THE PROVIDENTIAL SENSE IN THE MOZARABIC CHRONICLE OF 754
This triptych corresponds to the Spanish school, and though replete with Christian iconography, a Mozarabic influence--Andalusia was occupied by the Moors until the 15th century--can be discerned in the Eastern motifs that also adorn the work.