Mozarabic


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Related to Mozarabic: Mozarabic architecture

Moz·ar·a·bic

 (mō-zăr′ə-bĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to the Mozarabs, their language, or their culture.
n.
Any of the early Romance dialects spoken in the parts of the Iberian Peninsula under Moorish power and heavily influenced by Arabic.

Moz•ar•a•bic

(moʊˈzær ə bɪk)

adj.
1. of or characteristic of the Mozarabs or their speech.
n.
2. any of the Romance dialects, descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Visigothic kingdom, spoken in the portions of the Iberian Peninsula under Moorish control.
[1700–10]
Translations

Mozarabic

[mɒzˈærəbɪk]
A. ADJmozárabe
B. Nmozárabe m
References in periodicals archive ?
1517), archbishop of Toledo from 1495 to 1517, in preserving the city's unique Mozarabic rite, and on the subsequent reception history of his work that became "an early modern symbol of the Spanish nation" (p.
The verb can be found in medieval Mozarabic hargas from the Iberian Peninsula.
Contract notice: Cleaning the agency for innovation and development of andalusia in the following based in sevilla buildings: the file-store located at c / camino mozarabic, ship 30 in camas (sevilla); the site in c / leonardo da vinci, building no.
This triptych corresponds to the Spanish school, and though replete with Christian iconography, a Mozarabic influence--Andalusia was occupied by the Moors until the 15th century--can be discerned in the Eastern motifs that also adorn the work.
THE LOSS OF SPAIN: THE TOPIC OF LAMENTATION AND THE PROVIDENTIAL SENSE IN THE MOZARABIC CHRONICLE OF 754
Without the usual wedding frivolities, they exchanged vows-in Spanish-in the Mozarabic Rite of Toledo held on their 14th anniversary as a couple.
The critical edition of the Visigothic and Mozarabic hymnody available to date was Clemens Blume's Hymnodia Gotica.
Mozarabic was in itself divided among many different regional Iberian dialects or variants.
We can say the same of the sequences, tropes, conductus, Mozarabic preces, and so on.
13) Eventually, however, the Mozarabic liturgy was banned by papal command at the Council of Burgos in the late eleventh century (Donovan 21).
The sounds of the Mozarabic rite that some people associate with "Arabic" music are simply analogous to those of the Greek Orthodox Church.