bundy

(redirected from Mr. Bundy)

bundy

(ˈbʌndɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a time clock
2. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) punch the bundy informal
a. to start work
b. to be in regular employment
vb
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) (intr; foll by on or off) to arrive or depart from work, esp when it involves registering the time of arrival or departure on a card
[from a trademark]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
By NBC's account, the BLM established that Bundy's "permission to graze his cattle on public lands would depend on tortoise sitings." (4) By Breitbart.com's account (which I'm not sure is accurate), the BLM "informed grazing permit holders like Bundy that cattle counts would need to be reduced to 150 head." (5) A BLM document I obtained states the following: "In 1993, some of the terms of Mr. Bundy's grazing permit for the Bunkerville allotment [the relevant plot of land] were modified to protect the desert tortoise.
"But instead of docketing the judgment, instead of taking that piece of paper and filing it in the courthouse and waiting for Mr. Bundy to pass the property on to someone else ...
Mr. Bundy said dealing with methamphetamine addiction consumes a majority of his time each day.
Mr. Bundy, who, with his four deputies, serves residents over a 750-square-mile area, said methamphetamine addiction consumes a majority of his time each day.
Mr. Bundy noted that methamphetamine addiction is particularly problematic for several reasons.
"It's very gratifying to be able to help your client meet its space requirements in a truly spectacular new building" stated Mr. Bundy.
Questioning the quality of work coming out of training institutions (as Jeanmarie Simpson of Nevada Shakespeare Company did) is not a form of dismissal, but the beginning of the much-needed "deep conversation" that Mr. Bundy proposes to address these issues.
On December 31, 1960, while announcing Bundy's appointment as special assistant at a press conference, Kennedy told reporters that he and Bundy intended to use the NSC "and its machinery more flexibly than in the past, in line with recommendations made by the [Jackson] Subcommittee." (20) In an official press release the following day, Kennedy signaled his desire for change: I intend to consolidate under Mr. Bundy's direction the present National Security Council secretariat, the staff and functions of the Operations Coordinating Board, and the continuing functions of a number of special projects staffs within the White House.
"Mr. Bundy is, in the view of all who have worked with him in various settings, an extraordinary leader," said Yale prexy Richard C.
"Speck, that clumsy kid of yours could fall out of a hole," Mr. Bundy told my dad.
I directed my commentary to many of the students that Mr. Bundy and his colleagues have rejected, to students who have become disillusioned with their training programs, and to the youngsters who have yet to enter the field.
Margulies' "Dinner With Friends" and Martin's "Mr. Bundy" are strong works with excellent prospects; Wallace's "The Trestle at Pope Lick Creek" and Akalaitis' "Ti Jean Blues" are intriguing but flawed; Spencer's "Resident Alien" and Mastrosimone's "Like Totally Weird" were of insufficient quality to merit initial production, let alone future revisitation.