Mrs


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Mrs

(ˈmɪsɪz)
n, pl Mrs or Mesdames
a title used before the name or names of a married woman
[C17: originally an abbreviation of mistress]

Mrs.

(ˈmɪs ɪz, ˈmɪz ɪz)

pl. Mmes. (meɪˈdɑm, -ˈdæm)
1. a title of respect prefixed to the name of a married woman: Mrs. Jones.
2. a title prefixed to a mock surname that is used to represent possession of a particular attribute, identity, etc.: Mrs. Punctuality.
[abbr. of mistress]
usage: See Ms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mrs - a form of address for a married womanMrs - a form of address for a married woman
form of address, title of respect, title - an identifying appellation signifying status or function: e.g. `Mr.' or `General'; "the professor didn't like his friends to use his formal title"
Translations
الْسَّيِدَةُسَيِّـدهَ، عَقيلَه
paní
frufr.
Pr
rouva
gospođa
-né
frú
既婚女性の名字の前に付ける敬称
...여사
misis
misis, kundze
SraSra.
Ga
Frfru
นาง

Mrs

[ˈmɪsɪz]
A. N ABBR (pl inv) =MistressSra., señora
Mrs Pitt wants to see youla señora (de) Pitt quiere verte
yes, Mrs Brownsí, señora Brown MR, MRS, MISS
B. CPD Mrs Mop N (Brit) (hum) → la maruja

Mrs

Mrs. [ˈmɪsɪz] n
Mrs X → Madame X, Mme X

Mrs

abbr of MistressFrau f

Mrs

[ˈmɪsɪz] nsignora
Mrs Black → la signora Black (on letter) → Sig.ra Black (direct address) → signora Black

Mrs

(ˈmisiz) noun
a polite title given to a married woman, in writing or in speaking. Please come in, Mrs Anderson.

Mrs

الْسَّيِدَةُ paní fru Frau Κα Sra. rouva Mme gospođa signora 既婚女性の名字の前に付ける敬称 ...여사 Mw fru Pani Sra. госпожа fru นาง Bayan 夫人
References in classic literature ?
Pickwick, 'that having left a good many things at Mrs. Bardell's, in Goswell Street, I ought to arrange for taking them away, before I leave town again.'
Give it, and tell Mrs. Bardell she may put a bill up, as soon as she likes.'
Betaking himself straight homeward, Mr Boffin, without further let or hindrance, arrived at the Bower, and gave Mrs Boffin (in a walking dress of black velvet and feathers, like a mourning coach- horse) an account of all he had said and done since breakfast.
'Now, I'll tell you what I want, Noddy,' said Mrs Boffin, smoothing her dress with an air of immense enjoyment, 'I want Society.'
Mrs Nickleby becomes acquainted with Messrs Pyke and Pluck, whose Affection and Interest are beyond all Bounds
Mrs Nickleby had not felt so proud and important for many a day, as when, on reaching home, she gave herself wholly up to the pleasant visions which had accompanied her on her way thither.
Mrs. Higgins was brought up on Morris and Burne Jones; and her room, which is very unlike her son's room in Wimpole Street, is not crowded with furniture and little tables and nicknacks.
In the corner diagonally opposite the door Mrs. Higgins, now over sixty and long past taking the trouble to dress out of the fashion, sits writing at an elegantly simple writing-table with a bell button within reach of her hand.
Resigning herself to inevitable fate by making the best of those people, the Miggleses, and submitting her philosophy to the draught upon it, of which she had foreseen the likelihood in her interview with Arthur, Mrs Gowan handsomely resolved not to oppose her son's marriage.
When, to these three-fold points of prudence there is added the fact that Mrs Gowan yielded her consent the moment she knew of Mr Meagles having yielded his, and that Mr Meagles's objection to the marriage had been the sole obstacle in its way all along, it becomes the height of probability that the relict of the deceased Commissioner of nothing particular, turned these ideas in her sagacious mind.
The address communicated by Mrs. Todd took me to a lodging-house situated in a respectable street near the Gray's Inn Road.
Mrs. Sparsit sat in her afternoon apartment at the Bank, on the shadier side of the frying street.