Mulberry Harbour


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Mulberry Harbour

n
(Historical Terms) either of two prefabricated floating harbours towed across the English Channel to the French coast for the Allied invasion of Normandy in 1944
[from the code name Operation Mulberry]
References in periodicals archive ?
The huge floating Mulberry Harbours, built on Conwy Morfa,and (left)historian Ivor Wynne Jones at the Mulberry Harbour memorial overlooking the estuary
Coun Pattinson,a keen local historian, said there had been pressure in the past for a heritage centre in the town and the building of the Mulberry harbour should be featured.
The crew had to tow parts of the man-made Mulberry Harbour across to Arromanches before recovering the bodies of United States soldiers from the water.
The harbour was built to alhe Scots Royal artillery stands on the Mulberry harbour as he plays a replica set of Millin-Montgomery pipes in Arromanches-Les-Bains, low Allied troops to offload heaving equipment as 156,000 troops launched an attack on the beaches of Normandy on July 6, 1944
The day was marked in France at 7.25am local time by lone piper Major Trevor Macey-Lillie, of 19th Regiment Royal Artillery (The Scottish Gunners) playing a lament on the remaining Mulberry harbour in the town called Port Winston.
The start of the day was marked in France at 7.25am local time by lone piper Major Trevor Macey-Lillie, of 19th Regiment Royal Artillery (The Scottish Gunners) playing a lament on the remaining Mulberry harbour in the town called Port Winston.
Pipe Major Macey-Lillie, of 19th Regiment Royal Artillery (The Scottish Gunners), had climbed a remnant of the Mulberry Harbour shipped across from England to create an instant floating port to supply the Allies.
The lone piper began the lament at 7.25am local time (6.26am BST) on the remaining Mulberry Harbour in the town called Port Winston, signalling the minute the invasion began and the moment the first British soldier landed on Gold beach in Nazi-occupied France.
This quiet fishing village became the site of the British Mulberry harbour, from which millions of tonnes of supplies poured into France, sustaining the invasion.
The D-Day Museum there is on the site of the Mulberry harbour built by soldiers to bring thousands of vehicles ashore.
Giant concrete blocks are dotted in the sea, all that remains of the Mulberry Harbour towed over from Britain in June 1944.
Giant concrete blocks are dotted in the sea, all that remains from the Mulberry Harbour towed over from Britain in June 1944.