Mulberry Harbour


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Mulberry Harbour

n
(Historical Terms) either of two prefabricated floating harbours towed across the English Channel to the French coast for the Allied invasion of Normandy in 1944
[from the code name Operation Mulberry]
References in periodicals archive ?
Prime Minister Winston Churchill later travelled to Mulberry harbour on Sword Beach for a tour of inspection.
The history of the Mulberry Harbour began with Winston Churchill, whose bitter experience of the Dardanelles campaign in the First World War had taught him the necessity of a port for the efficient supply and movement of men and materiel.
There you go, Mulberry Harbour almost 50 years before D-Day.
Pegasus Bridge (where the gliders landed), Arromanches-les-Bains where the Mulberry Harbour is still in place today and, from the first World War, the trenches near Ypres.
But on our visit we heard how Buckler's Hard had played its part in another great war effort - with sections of die Mulberry Harbour being built there for die D-Day Normandy Landings in June 1944.
But on our visit we heard how Buckler's Hard had played its part in another great war effort - with sections of the Mulberry Harbour being built there for the D-Day Normandy Landings in June 1944.
It was also the place where Hugh Iorys Hughes developed, and later built, the floating Mulberry Harbour, used in Operation Overlord in World War II.
London, June 19 ( ANI ): The original plans for the Mulberry harbour invention that allowed the Allied invasion of France on D-Day, that is June 6, 1944, is expect to fetch 60,000 pounds at auction.
Our first trip, about half-an-hour's drive up the coast, was to Arromanches where the remains of Mulberry Harbour can still be seen off-shore.
In the main I would like to know about any men who were in the CB battalions helping to build concrete barges and the Mulberry Harbour project.
On arrival in Normandy the car fell into the sea from the Mulberry harbour but was made roadworthy again within 24 hours.