Mulciber


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Mulciber

(ˈmʌlsɪbə)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) another name for Vulcan1
References in classic literature ?
Nor was his name unheard or unador'd In ancient Greece; and in AUSONIAN land Men call'd him MULCIBER; and how he fell From Heav'n, they fabl'd, thrown by angry JOVE Sheer o're the Chrystal Battlements: from Morn To Noon he fell, from Noon to dewy Eve, A Summers day; and with the setting Sun Dropt from the Zenith like a falling Star, On LEMNOS th' AEGAEAN Ile: thus they relate, Erring; for he with this rebellious rout Fell long before; nor aught avail'd him now To have built in Heav'n high Towrs; nor did he scape By all his Engins, but was headlong sent With his industrious crew to build in hell.
Milton names the city of Pandemonium as the capital of hell, noting its immense size and identifying it as a "meeting center." Its architect, Mulciber, was famous for building things on a grand scale.
When Scudamour, encouraged by Britomart's success, attempts the same, "cruell Mulciber [epithet of Vulcan, Roman god of fire] would not obay / His threatfull pride" (26.5-6).
Nor was his name unheard or unadored In ancient Greece and in Ausonian land Men called him Mulciber, and how he fell From Heav'n they fabl'd, thrown by angry Jove Sheer o'er the crystal battlements.
This is the fall of Mulciber, the name by which the Greeks knew Mammon, of whom they fabled:
Mulciber, ut perhibent, his oscula coniugis emit Moenibus et tales uxoris obtulit acres.
Citing the famous description of Mulciber's fall--"From mom / To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, / A summer's day" (PL 1.742-44)--Machacek curiously traces the passage not to the celebrated fall of Hephaestus in Iliad 1.591-94, but instead to Odyssey 7.288, where Odysseus describes his long slumber after he has washed ashore in Phaeacia.
Milton includes, for example, in his description the building of Pandemonium, that the "architect" was "Mulciber," also known as Vulcan or Hephaistos, the Greco-Roman god of fire, conventionally understood to be a blacksmith or metalworker (I.730-51).
hic Nomadum genus et discinctos Mulciber Afros, hic Lelegas Carasque sagittiferosque Gelonos finxerat; Euphrates ibat iam molior undis, extremique hominum Morini, Rhenusque bicornis, indomitique Dahae, etpontem indignatus Araxes (A.8.720-728).
(49) The emphatic references to the 'Giants' (50) relate pointedly to the descriptions of the Fallen Angels in the first book of the poem, where, as Collett once pointed out, 'all the mythological references, with the exception of Mulciber at the end, are to the Titans' (p.